News

LHCP’s Visit to Germany 2019

Overview

From Wednesday, August 28th until Tuesday, September 3rd 2019, Karen Grimord, LHCP President and Donna Bolen, LHCP VP visited Germany to meet with three Landstuhl Hospital Care Project locations.


Karen & Donna with the DTC Staff
Karen & Donna with the DTC Staff

Deployment Transition Center (DTC)

It was undeniably clear that these ladies were on a mission. As soon as Karen and Donna arrived, they hit the ground running full speed. They met with the entire DTC team of 20 staff where the LHCP was recognized for all of their efforts and engagement. Next the ladies met with the leadership and closet representatives, they discussed the vision and expectations for the future of the organization. Then, they conducted a site tour and viewed the state of the closet. They accompanied the reps to the Ramstein Commissary to purchase a bulk of goods and supplies for the upcoming “surge” where 897 redeployers were expected to arrive within the upcoming month. These goods ranged from 4 pallets of water bottles to personal hygiene items like deodorant. The DTC found it difficult to imagine serving redeployers without the support and aid of LHCP.


Laundry
DTC laundry items

Karen and Donna were highly engaged, with a hands-on approach they spent hours with staff dividing over 1,000 powdered laundry detergent bags and laundry pods (for sensitive skin needs) into 2 load baggies. They also dedicated a plethora of energy and time rearranging the DTC closet and stocking boxed goods. The selfless service and drive displayed by Karen and Donna served as a motivation and inspiration to the entire DTC team.

DTC closet
DTC closet

View & Download orginal pdf

Xin Qi

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Xin Qi.


Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Xin Qi

Died January 23, 2010 Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom

Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Xin Qi
Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Xin Qi

25, of Cordova, Tenn.; assigned to 4th Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, Marine Expeditionary Brigade-Afghanistan; died Jan. 23 while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan.


U.S. Department of Defense, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs) News Release

Xin Qi
Xin Qi

Petty Officer, Second Class, Xin Qi, of Cordova was killed in action Saturday, January 23, 2010, in Afghanistan. Qi was with the Fourth Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, Marine Expeditionary Brigade. He died while supporting combat operations. Qi was a corpsman. Corpsman often travel with Marines to give medical help when needed.

Qi was 25 years old and joined the Navy in June of 2006.

26 January 2010:

A 25-year-old Navy reservist and former University of Texas student was killed Saturday while serving as a Navy Hospital Corpsman alongside U.S. Marine forces in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

Xin Qi, of Cordova, Tennessee, was living in Central Texas and taking classes at the University of Texas before his deployment, said Lieutenant Commander Michael Evans, commanding officer of the Navy Operational Support Center at Camp Mabry, where Qi served as a Navy reservist.

“Petty Officer Qi was a dedicated sailor and an invaluable asset to both his reserve unit and to my staff,” Evans said in a statement. “He always lent his time and excellent corpsman skills to my medical department on drill weekends, which directly contributed to Austin’s sailors maintaining their medical and dental health at 100 percent, keeping them ready to answer our country’s call at a moment’s notice.”

Evans said Qi had volunteered for his deployment with the Fourth Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, Marine Expeditionary Brigade-Afghanistan.

The Department of Defense said Qi was killed while supporting combat operations. According to published reports, Qi was killed in a suicide bomb attack that killed a Marine and left others wounded.

Corpsmen, who are enlisted medical specialists, provide battlefield medical aid to Marine Corps units.


Guest Book for PETTY OFFICER 2ND CLASS Xin Qi, U.S. Navy

Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Xin Qi
Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Xin Qi

It has been over three years since I had to say goodbye to you in that awful dusty place. I wish I could have done more for you that day but I think that God had already accepted your sacrifice for your Marines.

Your goofy smile, love of that computer and ability to irritate Senior Chief always improved my attitude, even on the most awful days. I will always pray for your family.

Todd D Bell, CDR (FMF) USN

 


I went through FMSS with Qi, he was my platoon’s education officer (I believe that was the title) and would lead the class study sessions before tests. He was very motivated and had a LOT of drive. He certainly earned the title ‘Doc’ as he took his immediate job of saving lives very seriously as well as his overall sacrifice of his younger years to give back to this country. He wouldn’t have seen it as anything heroic however or even a sacrifice, to him this was more of an obligation to give back to our country. The fact that Qi was a Corpsman makes me even prouder of having been a ‘devil doc’ as I have the privilege of standing on the shoulders of giants like Xin Qi.

He was a very good Corpsman whom I would rather have looking over me than many MD’s that I know of if I was in need of care. Thank You Qi for leaving us with your legacy and privilege of knowing you. If his parents ever read this, please know your Son will not be forgotten and he has given hundreds of others inspiration and a role model. He was very sincere about his job and interactions with others, a very kind and caring individual.

Thank you for raising him right and giving us a brother who we had the privilege of serving with. I miss you Qi and thank you brother.

John Guthrie


Sources:

Marquis J. McCants

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army Cpl. Marquis J. McCants


Army Cpl. Marquis J. McCants

Died May 18, 2007 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

Marquis J. McCants
Marquis J. McCants

23, of San Antonio; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, N.C.; died May 18 in Baghdad of wounds sustained when his unit came in contact with enemy forces using an improvised explosive device and small-arms fire. Also killed was Sgt 1st Class Scott J. Brown.


September Honors

Army Spec. Marquis J. McCants, a songwriter, hoped to earn a degree in music and begin producing hip-hop albums.

“He really didn’t think the war would last,” said his father, Savage McCants. “Music was his true love. He’d sit down and write music and lyrics.”

McCants, 23, of San Antonio, was killed May 18, 2007, by an explosive and small-arms fire in Baghdad. He was assigned to Fort Bragg, N.C. He worked at a Sam’s Club before enlisting. He chose to be a medic because he wanted to help people.

“He was always looking out for his friends,” said his father, Savage McCants said. “Marq,” as he was known, had a loving spirit and many friends. “He couldn’t stand to see anybody down,” his father said.

“His medical knowledge, grace under pressure and attentive care to the men of his platoon earned him respect far beyond his rank and experience,” said Capt. Phillip Smith.

He also is survived by his wife, Andrea, and two daughters, Azaria McCants and Deja Martinez. He turned to military service to provide a stable income for his wife and children. “Everything Marquis did was for his family,” his father said.


Monday, May 28, 2007 Planted In His Honor where he use to work before the Military.

Marquis McCants laid to rest

Army CPL Marquis J. McCants
Army CPL Marquis J. McCants

At the start of a gray Memorial Day weekend, family, friends and fellow soldiers gathered at Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery on Saturday morning to bury Spc. Marquis J. McCants, the 28th San Antonian killed in action in Iraq.

The rain cleared long enough for McCants’ flag-draped coffin to arrive at the gravesite after a slow and somber procession, carried by a horse-drawn caisson accompanied by an honor guard.

A rifle volley, followed by a lone bugle sounding taps, echoed over a sea of white headstones, each decorated with a small American flag, as is the custom for Memorial Day weekend. The moment the service concluded, a light rain resumed.

“It’s cloudy outside, but the sun is shining through,” said the Rev. Elder McCants, pastor of Holy Cross Lutheran Church of San Antonio and the deceased soldier’s cousin, who officiated at the service. “That’s God’s grace.”

At a memorial service at Sunset Funeral Chapel earlier Saturday, Maj. Gen. Russell J. Czerw, commander of the U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School, presented McCants’ wife, Andrea McCants, and parents with his posthumous honors, a Bronze Star, Purple Heart, Army Good Conduct Medal and Combat Medical Badge. “This is the home of the free because of brave men like Marquis,” Czerw said. “He will not be forgotten.”

McCants, 23, who also leaves behind three young children, was a combat medic assigned to the 1st Battalion, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division based at Fort Bragg, N.C.

He was one of two soldiers killed May 18 in Baghdad when their unit was attacked with an improvised explosive device and small-arms fire.

Marquis J. McCants
Marquis J. McCants

“He was one of the most caring guys I knew, as far as caring for his brothers in arms,” said Spc. Chase Walden, who served three years with McCants but returned to the United States the day before he was killed. “It was a pleasure serving with him,” Walden said. “I’m going to miss him greatly.”

At his service, Elder McCants told family and friends that his cousin had gone to “a better life than this sinful world.” “The mansion that Jesus built is better than the White House, better than anything Saddam Hussein built,” he said. Another cousin, Romero McCants of Milwaukee, recalled McCants as someone who loved life, with a quick grin and a passion for living. “When he said he was your friend, he was your friend,” he said. “If he said he had your back, he had it all the way to the end.”

Marquis McCants was a 2001 graduate of O’Connor High School. He was a talented songwriter and had hoped to earn a degree in music, his family said.

He joined the Army in 2005 and was known as “Doc” to the soldiers in his unit.

“Marquis, like so many before him, readily stepped forward, and he joined the Army,” Czerw said. “The Army provided him the skills … to provide care and comfort to his fellow soldiers at arms.”

Sources:

Shannon Chihuahua

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army Spc. Shannon Chihuahua.


Army Spc. Shannon Chihuahua

Died November 12, 2010 Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom

Shannon Chihuahua
Shannon Chihuahua

25, of Thomasville, Ga.; assigned to 1st Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Ky.; died Nov. 12 in Watahpur district, Kunar province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using small-arms fire and rocket-propelled grenades.


Slain Fort Campbell soldier to get Silver Star

FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. The family of a Fort Campbell-based combat medic killed in combat in Afghanistan is set to receive a Silver Star on his behalf on Feb. 7, 2014.

Army Spc. Shannon Chihuahua
Army Spc. Shannon Chihuahua

The U.S. Army awarded the honor to 25-year-old Spc. Shannon Chihuahua of Thomasville, Ga., who died Nov. 12, 2010, during an attack in Kunar province in eastern Afghanistan. The Army says Chihuahua placed his own safety second to that of his fellow soldiers as insurgents fired small arms and rocket-propelled grenades.

Chihuahua was a combat medic assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division. He joined the Army in July 2008 and arrived at Fort Campbell in July 2009.

A Silver Star is the third highest military decoration for valor granted by the military.


Spc. Shannon Chihuahua 25, of Thomasville, GA. (Army Medic) – KIA in Afghanistan While Helping Others

November 18, 2010 at 11:23 PM

 The family of a Thomasville soldier Shannon Chihuahua said they want him remembered as a man who lived life to the fullest.  Chihuahua was the fourth of five children.

 The 25-year-old U.S. Army Medic was killed as he was trying to help a comrade during an attack in Afghanistan Friday, after suffering massive trauma in the incident in the Wataphur District, Konar province. The Defense Department says the unit was attacked by insurgents with small-arms fire and rocket-propelled grenades.

 The Chihuahua family said it’s looking to a higher being for strength in this difficult time. They tell us they wanted to share Chihuahua’s story; how he lived his life and why he joined the Army. His tragic death reflects the passion he had for saving lives said Kristen Chihuahua his wife of 4-years.  “My husband wasn’t just killed he lived an amazing life; in a way some of us are scared to live,” she said.

 Despite her efforts to change his mind, Chihuahua joined the Army in 2008. “He said he wanted to save the lives of the men in the front of line,” she adds.

Army Spc. Shannon Chihuahua
Army Spc. Shannon Chihuahua

Chihuahua learned about her husband’s death about 6 p.m. Friday. “A chaplain came to my apartment and told me my husband had been killed,” she told the Times-Enterprise during a telephone interview from the Philadelphia airport.  Chihuahua’s last conversation with her husband was on the day he died. “He told me he was going out on a mission, and it would be a couple of days before he talked to me again,” the young widow, the former Kristen Freeman of Thomasville, said.

 “I love daddy!” exclaims 3-year old Sophia Chihuahua. She can’t quite grasp the sacrifice her father made for his country. Looking into the faces of her girls, Kristen says she’d rather be a single mother than not have them at all.  “I’m just so grateful for that because I look at my children and see my husband’s face,” she says.

 “I can’t express how proud of him I am. How selfless he was,” says her mother, Kristen Chihuahua. “He loved this country and he believed in what he was fighting for. It meant so much to him for his daughters to be whatever they dreamed they could be.” “Part of the soldier’s creed is never leave a fallen comrade,” explains Shannon’s sister, Jessica Frausto. “Every day he went out and lived up to those words.” His mother Denise Jenkins adds, “When he was a little boy, he said he wanted to be a doctor. At first I thought about him being so clumsy. But he proved to me he could and made us all proud.”

 The fallen solider is a Thomasville native and 2004 graduate of Thomas County Central High School.  He and his wife married Nov. 4, 2006, two months after they met. His brother Alex Chihuahua remembers when his brother talked about getting a Superman tattoo.  Last Friday, his brother became a hero. “I feel like he’s still Superman–bullet proof,” Alex said. His oldest brother Eric Chihuahua says he was so proud of his little brother, his heroic actions instantly made him bigger than all of them.  “He became my big brother then” he said. But the Chihuahua family tells us this selfless man was more than a soldier. He was a dedicated father to two beautiful girls; 3-year-old Annabelle and 5-month old Sophia.  “I never met anyone who loved their children this much,” said Kristen. “I guess he was trying to love them enough to last for the rest of their lives.” The second youngest of five brothers and sisters was the jokester in the family. “He liked to make other people laugh, even if we were laughing at him,” said Jessica Frausto his youngest sister.

 This week there’s tears of sadness but the family says’ there’s also a sense of pride in knowing they were part of a special man’s life. “Even though I only had 4 years of my husband, I considered myself lucky, to have been there to support him in his dreams,” Kristen said.  With the help of the entire family she said, her girls will know how special their father was.  A positive person, an incredible father — these are the words Kristen Chihuahua used to describe her husband, Army Spc. Shannon Chihuahua Monday. Shannon’s family says fond memories are helping them through this painful time.

 “He was just always doing silly things that made you laugh. He was a really fun kid,” says his brother, Eric Chihuahua. Another sister, Christina Smith remembers, “When my mom was pregnant with him, I wanted a little sister. I was like, if it’s a girl we’re going to name her Shanna. But if it’s a boy, we’re going to name him Shannon. So that was his name and he always said why did you have to give me a girl’s name?”

  He was deployed May 2010 and she last saw him June 22, two weeks after Annabelle was born.  “He was full of energy and always wanted to make people smile,” she said.

Sources: 

2019 Issue 2 Newsletter

Inside this issue:

  • Spotlight on Volunteer Judy Badgley
  • A Little Piece of Home
  • Help Us Help Them
  • 2019 Sponsors (April – June)
  • Honorees for 2 nd Issue 2019
  • Shipping Statistics
  • Unit Needs Continue

You can also view and download the original form 2019 Issue 2 Newsletter PDF version here.


Spotlight on Volunteer Judy Badgley

The Landstuhl Hospital Care Project (LHCP) would be nowhere without its steadfast and loyal corps of volunteers. Some have been supporting LHCP for years! Judy Badgley is one such dedicated person.

One of Judy’s blankets.
One of Judy’s blankets.

Judy was active with the Patriot Guard Riders when she saw the Norwich, NY, American Legion Riders advertising their annual ride fundraiser for LHCP. She looked up LHCP and decided to join the group and see how she could help out. It wasn’t long before she began to sew for us! In her words, “I started to sew because the LHCP group needed sham pillow cases and Karen kept asking but all that was being donated was six here or a dozen there and she was asking for something like 1,500.  That was back in 2008. I started to make the pillowcases and THAT WAS ALL I was going to do.”

Well no, that wasn’t all she was going to do. The group needed more help, so she began sewing medicine bags, comfort pillows, and blankets. It’s now 2019 and she’s still hard at work for our military!

Some of our military happily posing with Judy’s pillows
Some of our military happily posing with Judy’s pillows

Her current item totals are:

  • 5,434 Sham Pillowcases
  • 2,705 Comfort Pillows
  • 554 (4×6) Fleece Blankets
  • 306 (3×5) Fleece Blankets
  • 81 (4×6) Flannel Quilts/Blankets
  • 256 Medicine Bags

Somewhere along the way, she got her mother involved sewing Christmas stockings! She’s donated well over 500!

Judy just recently finished up a large sewing project for LHCP, working with donations from the American Legion Auxiliary Girls Nation. Last summer, for the second year in a row, the Girls Nation chose LHCP to support during their yearly mock Senate event. Two girls from every state headed to Washington, DC, and brought fabric as donations to LHCP. That fabric was then mailed to Judy, who spent the next four to five months making it into 302 sham pillowcases and 41 comfort pillows!

It’s been over ten years that Judy Badgley has been sewing for LHCP and our service men and women. Thank you, Judy, for all your hard work and serving the men and women who serve our country!


A Little Piece of Home

During the Korean Conflict, my Dad was in Korea. One year for
Christmas, Santa Claus brought me a bake set. My Mom and I
made a little cake, probably not much bigger than a cupcake. She
put the cake in a box and packed it with popcorn and sent it off to
my Dad. Many, many years later, I asked Mom if Dad ever got the
cake. She said yes he did. It was in crumbs, but he told her he ate
every bite then ate the popcorn it was packed in. He told her it was
the finest cake he had ever eaten. He was so happy to have a little
something from home.

So it is with shipments the LHCP sends to our troops. They are
thankful for every tube of toothpaste, boxer briefs, hoodie, sweats,
or protein snacks. In 2019, we have shipped approximately 35,000
items to support the men and women serving our country.
It is our hope that every item the LHCP sends to our Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, and Marines makes a difference and gives them a little
piece of home.

    — Donna Bolen


Help Us Help Them

LHCP would love to have you or your organization sponsor a fundraising event to support the LHCP mission to provide comfort and care items to sick, injured or wounded military services members overseas.

Or just start a Facebook fundraiser! Go to your news feed, click Fundraisers on the left menu. Click Select a Nonprofit, type Landstuhl in the search box. Select Landstuhl Hospital Care Project, then follow the Facebook prompts and create!

For more info, please contact Karen Grimord at 540-286-1512 or email at president@lhcp.us


With Gratitude to Our Generous Sponsors

2019 Sponsors—April, May, and June

Individuals and Families

Achley, P., VAKurzenknabe, G., PA
Adotta, Vito, VAMcKay, A., AZ
Arseculeratne, R., VANelson, D., KS
Blevins, A., VAOsgood, J., APO
Boffardi, A., VAPineau, B., France
Bonilla, L., FLPriska, G., NC
Breidel, G., MNRoberts, G., TN
Driskill, T., TXSeljeskog, P., SD
Hansen, L., VASteinman, M., NV
Hazelwood, W., MEStockstill, J., MS
Heal, R., VAStutts, T., TN
Hembrough, W., TNTomaszewski, V., VA
High, T., TNTreadwell, R., VA
Jones, E., MNTunstall, I.Y., VA

Businesses and Organizations

  • American Legion Post 189, NY
  • Benevity Fund, Calgary, AB
  • Grace Chapel Inc., TN
  • Hillsboro Athens LLC, TN
  • National Sojourners Inc., PA
  • Network for Good, DC

    LHCP is Best in America!

Best in America
Best in America

The Independent Charities Seal of Excellence is awarded to the members of Independent Charities of America and Local Independent Charities of America that have, upon rigorous independent review, been able to certify, document, and demonstrate on an annual basis that they meet the highest standards of public accountability, program effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness. These standards include those required by the U.S. Government for inclusion in the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC), probably the most exclusive fund drive in the world. Of the 1,000,000 charities operating in the United States today, it is estimated that fewer than 50,000, or 5 percent, meet or exceed these standards, and, of those, fewer than 2,000 have been awarded this Seal.

Best in America – Landstuhl Hospital Care Project


Matching Funds for Nonprofits

Ask if your company has a matching funds program for nonprofits. Or straight out ask them to support LHCP. Tell them how good it feels to support those that sacrifice to keep our country free!


Honorees for 2nd Quarter 2019 Shipments

June

Navy Hospital Corpsman 3nd Class Brian K. Lundy Jr.

Died September 9, 2011 Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom

Brian K. Lundy Jr.
Brian K. Lundy Jr.

25, of Austin, Texas; assigned to 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 5, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.; died while conducting a dismounted patrol in Marjah, Helmand province, Afghanistan, on Sept. 9.

Full Story


May

Army Cpl. Rachael L. Hugo

Died October 5, 2007 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

Army Cpl. Rachael L. Hugo
Rachael L. Hugo

24, of Madison, Wis.; assigned to the 303rd Military Police Company, 97th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade, U.S. Army Reserve, Jackson, Mich.; died Oct. 5 in Bayji, Iraq, of wounds sustained when insurgents attacked her unit using an improvised explosive device and small-arms fire.

Full Story


April

Army CPL. Tony Carrasco Jr.

Died November 4, 2009 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

Tony Carrasco Jr.
Tony Carrasco Jr.

25, of Berino, N.M.; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 32nd Field Artillery Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan.; died Nov. 4 in Ad Dawr, Iraq, of a gunshot wound sustained when enemy forces attacked his unit.

Full Story


2019 CFC Campaign

CFC
CFC

Once again LHCP is a proud participant in the Combined Federal Campaign. Please consider giving this fall. Our agency designation code is 12282.

 


2019 April — June Shipping Statistics

COUNTRYWEIGHT (lbs)COSTBOXES SHIPPED
Germany5,623$9,867170
Iraq165$3377
Qatar1,004$193835
TOTALS6,792$12,142212

MONETARY DONATIONS MADE EASY!

Now you can make a monetary donation easily using PayPal! Go to www.paypal.com and send your donation to treasurer@lhcp.us and type in Landstuhl Hospital Care Project when asked for a name. Please include your address. We will send a letter of thanks for your tax-deductible donation.


Unit Needs Continue

At this time, LHCP is placing focus on receiving monetary donations. Unit needs are fluid, and we can quickly respond using cash donations to purchase requested items.

Please make checks payable to Landstuhl Hospital Care Project.

Please mail your packages and/or checks to:

LHCP President
Attn: Karen Grimord
29 Greenleaf Terrace
Stafford, VA 22556

LHCP is a 501 (c) (3) tax-exempt non-profit organization.


LHCP Board of Directors

Karen Grimord
president@lhcp.us

Donna Bolen
vicepresident@lhcp.us

James Spliedt II
secretary@lhcp.us

Newsletter Editor
Maria Waddell
lhcpnews@yahoo.com

Doyle W. Bollinger Jr.

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Doyle W. Bollinger Jr.


Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Doyle W. Bollinger Jr.

DOYLE W. BOLLINGER
DOYLE W. BOLLINGER

21, of Poteau, Okla.; assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 133, Gulfport, Miss.; killed in Iraq when a piece of unexploded ordnance accidentally detonated in the area he was working.


Doyle W. Bollinger

Doyle W. Bollinger joined the U.S. Navy shortly after high school. He was a Seabee.

“Wayne is a very special young man and is proud to be a Navy Seabee. He died defending his country. He is without doubt one of America’s finest,” a family statement said.

His unit has been in the Middle East since January, providing construction support to the Navy, Marines and other armed forces during military operations.

“He marched to the beat of a different drum, and he was happy in his own little world,” said Pat Eidschun, a retired teacher who taught Bollinger when he was in the seventh grade in Poteau.


Navy Petty Officer Third Class Doyle W. Bollinger, Jr. Overpass

Bollinger Overpass
Bollinger Overpass

The overpass is a 4-lane roadway along the Business Route of U.S. 59, spanning another 4-lane divided section of U.S. 59, where the routes converge with U.S. 271 south of Poteau, Oklahoma. Doyle “Wayne” Bollinger, Jr. joined the Navy shortly after graduating from Poteau High School in 2000. He was assigned to the “Seabees” with a rating (specialty) as a Builder. He was assigned for duty with Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 133 based at Gulfport, Mississippi.

He deployed overseas to the Middle East with his unit in January, 2003 in support of the Global War on Terrorism, and Operation Iraqi Freedom. Navy Petty Officer Third Class Bollinger was killed on June 6, 2003, at age 21, while serving his country in Iraq. He was working with his unit on a bridge over the Tigris River, connecting Baghdad with the city of Sarabadi, when a piece of unexploded ordnance detonated.

He was awarded the Naval Presidential Unit citation, National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Naval Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, Navy Rifle Marksmanship Ribbon, and Naval Pistol Marksmanship Ribbon. The overpass memorial was designated in 2005.


Slain Seabee called generous, always smiling

By Bob Doucette, The Oklahoman

POTEAU Petty Officer 3rd Class Doyle Wayne Bollinger Jr. was remembered Monday as an energetic young man who enjoyed giving to others.

Doyle W. Bollinger Jr.
Doyle W. Bollinger Jr.

“He marched to the beat of a different drum, and he was happy in his own little world,” said Pat Eidschun, a retired teacher who taught Bollinger when he was in the seventh grade. “He was so sweet.” Bollinger, who joined the U.S. Navy shortly after high school, died Friday in Iraq after unexploded ordnance accidentally detonated in the area where he was working, according to the Navy. Bollinger was 21.

Eidschun said Bollinger was a happy person who liked to give to others. “He was always grinning and had a smile on his face,” she said. “He wasn’t very big, but he didn’t know it. In his mind, he was a giant.”

Navy Petty Officer Third Class Doyle W. Bollinger, Jr.
Navy Petty Officer Third Class Doyle W. Bollinger, Jr.

In Poteau, Bollinger often did odd jobs for people and liked to give people things he’d found or made. Eidschun said she still has a ceramic turtle Bollinger gave her years ago. Bollinger was assigned to the Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 133, based in Gulfport, Miss.

Bollinger was killed when his unit was working on a bridge over the Tigris River near the city of Sarabadi, according to the Biloxi (Miss.) Sun-Herald newspaper. The bridge is on a highway that connects Baghdad to Sarabadi. Three other people were injured in the blast.

The Navy said Monday the explosion was not combat-related. The accident is under investigation.

 

Brian K. Lundy Jr.

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Brian K. Lundy.


Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Brian K. Lundy

Brian K. Lundy Jr.
Brian K. Lundy Jr.

Died September 9, 2011 Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom

25, of Austin, Texas; assigned to 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 5, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.; died while conducting a dismounted patrol in Marjah, Helmand province, Afghanistan, on Sept. 9.


Petty Officer 2nd Class Brian Keith Lundy, Jr.

Brian earned his heavenly wings on September 9, 2011. In the ever so brief 25 years that Brian was on this earth, he led a full and meaningful life. It began with his birth to Ramona Fowler and Brian Lundy Sr. at Bergstrom AFB, TX on July 29, 1986. Brian accepted Christ at an early age and was baptized by Rev. R.E. Foster at Zion Rest Missionary Baptist Church. He sang with the Voices of Joy and was an active member of TCIA and JCIA Youth groups. He was also a Jr. Deacon and early on demonstrated an eagerness to serve.

Brian had a passion for animals and as a young child spoke of being a veterinarian. He loved his Great Danes, his iguana and his parrot (who now resides with Brian’s mother). Brian loved motorcycles, which fulfilled his need to live on the edge and his need to go fast. Many of Brian’s friends witnessed his impulsiveness while experiencing his passion for nature and mankind. Good times were always guaranteed when Brian was around. Brian graduated from Bowie High School in May 2004. One of the fondest memories of Brian at Bowie High School was his participation in the Mr. Bowie Bulldog contest.

Even then Brian demonstrated signs of his outgoing personality. Brian received a scholarship to Huston Tillotson University and enrolled in August 2004. During this period of his life, he determined college did not provide the challenge and adventure that he was seeking so he decided on a different path.

Brian K. Lundy
Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Brian K. Lundy

Determined to fulfill this burning desire to do more with his life, help others, and serve his country, he enlisted in the United States Navy in May 2006. During Brian’s enlistment in the United States Navy, he successfully completed Basic Training and Hospital Corpsman “A” School in Great Lakes, Illinois. His first duty station was aboard the Aircraft Carrier USS Ronald Reagan from November 2006 to August 2008. His next assignment was the Naval Hospital 29 Palms, California from December 2008 to December 2010.

However, these past assignments still did not challenge Brian to his full potential. So once eligible, he applied for and was accepted to Special Training as a Hospital Corpsman with the Fleet Marine Force. Fleet Marine Force training consists of specialized training in advanced emergency medicine and the fundamentals of Marine Corps life, while emphasizing physical conditioning, small arms familiarity, and basic battlefield tactics. He went on to train for Fleet Marine Forces (FMF) in January 2011 and successfully completed FMF training in March 2011. After successful completion of this training, he was assigned to 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina in March 2011.

He then deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom to Afghanistan in July 2011. Brian often called his mother Ramona (“Mama”) detailing interesting stories about his duties as a Corpsman. He told her about having to deliver a baby, treating an Afghani National with multiple stab wounds, and even having to remove a rock from the eye of a young Afghanistan boy. Brian had finally found his calling and his purpose in life, and he was doing something that made him feel that he was making a difference in this world.

Ramona delighted in the fact that her little “Peanut” had become a man. Unfortunately, his acts of heroism were cut short after his life was taken while conducting a dismounted patrol at 11:44 A.M. (Afghanistan time) on September 9, 2011. At that moment a bright and shining star went dim.
However, the most rewarding commendation Brian ever received was the opportunity to help others and to give his life in the service of his country.

2019 Issue 1 Newsletter

Inside this issue:

  • In the Eyes of a Foreign Missionary
  • Troop Thanks
  • 2019 Spring Events
  • 2019 Sponsors (February-March)
  • Honorees for 1 st Issue 2019
  • On Facebook?
  • Unit Needs Continue

You can also view and download the original form 2019 Issue 1 Newsletter PDF version here.


In the Eyes of a Foreign Missionary

Who is Now a Friend

The story of how I met Karen Grimord, and by extension, working with The Landstuhl Hospital Care Project, is inextricably linked to the story of my voyage to America. Between the years 2011 to 2013, I opted to serve a volunteer mission for my church.  I was assigned to labor in the Northern Virginia area. A quiet boy without much in terms of years and experience, I was excited at the prospect of living so far away from my native Durban, South Africa.

I still remember the first day I met Karen. I’d been in the neighborhood for barely a week when we got an urgent phone call from a member of our congregation who said that, “a lady needed help packing boxes.” It was a Monday, the only day we got to ourselves from our busy schedule.  We reluctantly agreed and headed over to the address I had hastily penned down on the wrapper of my Chick-fil-A sandwich.

We actually found Karen in her backyard, digging what looked like a hole for a fireplace. We told her who we were and why we had come. She looked skeptical, and with good reason; we weren’t dressed for the part! White shirts, ties and dress pants don’t inspire confidence in the kind of work we would be doing. But we won her over by rolling up our sleeves and getting to work. And that was the beginning of a long and fruitful relationship.

Karen’s house (more particularly her garage) became something of a second home to me. We spent hours in there packing boxes, taking orders and sending off shipments to the local post office. It wasn’t until my third visit, tape gun in hand and sweat on my brow, as I worked on the next box that I asked who all of these care packages were meant for. She looked up slowly and responded: “It’s for soldiers that served our country and are now wounded and need taking care of in Landstuhl, Germany.” That was a sobering moment. I saw the passion in her eyes, the fire in her gut. I felt it deeply and I wanted to know more.

Everyone back home always asked me what my first impression of the United States was and my answer always took them by surprise because it’s not the typical response that they expected. ‘Til this day, I’ve emphatically stated that Americans have a level of devotion and patriotism that I’ve never seen before. It is rarely loud or boastful, but clearly felt and visible in quiet acts of service. It is the needle to their fabric, thread woven carefully into their symbol red, white, and blue. America has no existential crisis; they know exactly who they are and what they stand for. That is something to be admired.

It didn’t take long for Karen to take me on trips to D.C. proper and show me all the sights and monuments. I don’t think I quite got over the fact that this was the kind of stuff I only saw in movies; and dramatic ones at that-I half expected an alien invasion to take place starring yours truly! But on a serious note, two places of interest stood out to me more than the rest. The first was Arlington Cemetery. When I went there I was shocked into silence. I didn’t speak for the whole day that day. Not only was it the reverence of the sacred ground that was Arlington, but it was the evidence of commitment and sacrifice for the greater good. My tears were matched only by the row upon row of pearly-white marble. The second place was the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Whereas before I had seen those who had died for what they believed in, here I saw what the living were willing to do for one of their own. Their dedication and precision were equaled by the passion in their eyes and the fire in their gut- the exact same that I saw in Karen when we were packing boxes in her modest garage. That left an indelible mark on me, one I will never forget.

Since that day, I was never the same. And working on care packages took on a different meaning. I knew who it was for, and why they chose to serve. I even felt a connection to them all in some small way; though we hailed from different countries and speak in different tongues, we all were far from home, serving and working for an ideal that we believed in, trying to make this world just a little bit better. It’s been six years now since I was last in America, but if I close my eyes I can still see Karen’s garage, I can still smell the mulch on the warm summer’s air, I can still hear the screech of the tape gun as we worked on yet another box. The cardboard all stacked up neatly in a row from floor to ceiling and the table which had the laptop and phone, ready to take another order and send out the next shipment. All told one simple story: the nation which forgets its defenders will be itself forgotten.

Sphelele Mngoma


Troop Thanks

The LHCP is an incredible group of people donating to a good cause. While I was deployed, I worked in a program that helped to ease the transition of combat airmen returning home. That process would have been very difficult without LHCP support. On the first day out of a combat zone, the airmen were able to collect and utilize many of the donations made. These items included, sweaters, jackets, umbrellas, and hygienic items. After seeing the items available to them, there eyes would light up and there seemed to be a sense of relief—that they didn’t have to worry about not having anything. The LHCP is pivotal in easing the transition of our airmen returning from deployment. Karen and her team were phenomenal in ensuring the needs of many were met.

MSGT Air Force


2019 Spring Events

May 18, 2019 The Norwich American Legion Post 189 will hold their 14th annual motorcycle ride fundraiser for LHCP. Without such hard-working, dedicated individuals and groups like these, LHCP would not be able to continue. We thank you for your many years of support and look forward to seeing the pictures! Maybe this year we can get one of Brian and Karen Grimord!


2019 Sponsors

Individuals and Families

Adkins, E., MN
Arseculeratne, R., VA
Auman, C., FL
Barnhardt, C., MI
Bath, D, AL
Bath, M., AL
Breidel, G., MN
Bolen, D., SC
Broeker, J., FL
Burkel, D., MN
Byrnes, E., PA
Casali, L., FL
Daniels, B., OK
Dennis, T., FL
Eanes, L., VA
Ellsworth, L., TN
Hansen, L., VA
High, T., TN
Hurley, P., FL
Kelly, P., IL
Kosele, D., FL
Lambert, R., MD
Lienczewski, E., MI
Marion, D., TX
McKay, A., AZ
Osgood, J., APO
Payton, B., FL
Roberts, G., TN
Sann, R., DC
Seljeskog, P., SD
Smith, B., FL
Steinman, M., NV
Stutts, T., TN
Waddell, C., NC
Waddell, M., NC
Wolford, C., PA
Zimmerman, R., PA

Businesses and Organizations

American Legion Post 74 SAL Squad 74, FL
American Legion Riders Post 189, NY
American Veterans Post 21 General Fund, FL
AMVETS Ladies Auxiliary Post 21, FL
Benevity Fund, Calgary, AB
Beyond the Call of Duty Ministries Inc., FL
Carlie Lynne’s Inc., FL
Carrollton Zilwaulkee VFW Post 1859, MI
Cheyenne MNT Chapter, CA
Crosspointe Church, MS
Euclid Veterans Association, OH
Forty and Eight Voiture 880 Inc., FL
Hillsboro Athens LLC, TN
Holy Family R. C. Congregation, IL
Cheyenne MNT Chapter, CA
Crosspointe Church, MS
Euclid Veterans Association, OH
Forty and Eight Voiture 880 Inc., FL
Hillsboro Athens LLC, TN
Holy Family R. C. Congregation, IL
McPhail’s Auto Sales, FL
Network for Good, DC
Sebring Benefit, FL
Sons of AMVETS Squadron 21, FL
VFW Post 4300, FL
VFW Post 4300 Riders Inc., FL
Veron McCune Post NO 132 Auxiliary, OH

Honorees

January

Army Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini

Died January 11, 2008, Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom

Army Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini
Richard J. Berrettini

21, of Cranston, R.I.; assigned to Headquarters Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.; killed June 23 when a vehicle-borne improvised explosive device detonated near her convoy vehicle in Fallujah, Iraq.

February

Army 2nd Lt. Emily J.T. Perez

Died September 12, 2006 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

Emily J.T. Perez
Emily J.T. Perez

21, of Cranston, R.I.; assigned to Headquarters Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.; killed June 23 when a vehicle-borne improvised explosive device detonated near her convoy vehicle in Fallujah, Iraq.

March

Marine Lance Cpl. Minhee Kim

Died November 1, 2006 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

Marine Lance Cpl. Minhee Kim
Minhee Kim

20, of Ann Arbor, Mich.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 24th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division, Marine Forces Reserve, Lansing, Mich.; died Nov. 1 while conducting combat operations in Fallujah, Iraq.


On Facebook? Want to help LHCP?

You may have noticed friends on Facebook holding a fundraiser for their favorite charity on their birthday. LHCP has been so honored in the past few months by two young children, asking for donations to LHCP for their birthday! Please consider doing this as well!

Also, go to our Facebook page, www.facebook.com/theLHCP and follow us there if you haven’t already. Share the posts to let your friends know about us! Thank you


Unit Needs Continue

At this time, LHCP is placing focus on receiving monetary donations. Unit needs are fluid; and we can quickly respond using cash donations to purchase requested items.

Please make checks payable to Landstuhl Hospital Care Project.

and mail to:

LHCP President
Attn: Karen Grimord
29 Greenleaf Terrace
Stafford, VA 22556

Thank you.

Rachael Hugo

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army Cpl. Rachael L. Hugo.


Army Cpl. Rachael L. Hugo

Rachael L. Hugo
Rachael L. Hugo

Died October 5, 2007 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

24, of Madison, Wis.; assigned to the 303rd Military Police Company, 97th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade, U.S. Army Reserve, Jackson, Mich.; died Oct. 5 in Bayji, Iraq, of wounds sustained when insurgents attacked her unit using an improvised explosive device and small-arms fire.


Madison soldier killed in Iraq described as volunteer

The Associated Press

MADISON, Wis. — The Madison soldier killed last week in Iraq kept volunteering to go out with the troops when she could have stayed back on base, a great uncle says.

“That’s the kind of person she was,” Robert Hugo said of Army Reserve Spc. Rachael Hugo, 24, of Madison.

Army Cpl. Rachael L. Hugo
Army Cpl. Rachael L. Hugo

The Defense Department said Oct. 6 she died Oct. 5 when insurgents attacked her unit using an improvised explosive device and small-arms fire. She was assigned to the 303rd Military Police Company based in Jackson, Mich. The 88th Regional Readiness Command of the Reserves said her parents, Kermit and Ruth Hugo, would hold a news conference Oct. 8 in Madison that will also be attended by her brother, Scott.

Juanita Davis, 21, who described herself as a friend of the soldier, said Hugo had been working toward a bachelor’s degree in nursing at Viterbo University in La Crosse before she was deployed to Iraq a little more than a year ago. “She would do anything for anybody,” Davis said. “Her heart was always in everything that she did.”

Davis described her friend’s job in Iraq as combat medic. While “I knew she didn’t like being there … she knew that she was there to serve her country,” Davis added. She said Hugo would have returned to Viterbo after her deployment ended.

As a part-time certified home health aide for the La Crosse County Health department, Hugo would visit homebound patients to help with daily health needs, said Gwen Loveless, a former co-worker. “She was excellent with everybody,” Loveless said. “She worked so hard.

I wish I had her drive.” Hugo also worked at Meriter Hospital in Madison as a nursing assistant in the hospital’s mobile unit, according to Sue Simo, one of her supervisors there. Simo said Hugo would work at Meriter during breaks from school. “She was a lovely young woman, mature beyond her age,” Simo said.


Parents: Medic killed in Iraq had saved a soldier’s life

By Ryan J. Foley, The Associated Press

MADISON, Wis. — A Madison woman killed in Iraq last week had won an award for saving another soldier’s life earlier in her tour, her parents said Oct. 8.

Spc. Rachael Hugo, 24, was killed Oct. 5 when her Army Reserve unit was attacked by insurgents with a roadside bomb and small-arms fire, military officials said. She was serving as a combat medic with a Michigan-based unit expected to return to the U.S. in about a month.

Sgt. Maj. Janet Jones, a spokeswoman for the Army Reserve, said she believed Hugo was treating another soldier when she was killed during the incident in Bayji, Iraq. She said details were sketchy and an investigation into her death was underway.

Rachael L. Hugo
Rachael L. Hugo

The former high school cheerleader was looking forward to coming home and had even gone on an online shopping spree for new clothes, said her mother, Ruth Hugo. Her parents and her little brother remembered Hugo as a beautiful and intelligent woman who had a passion for caring for the wounded. In an e-mail to her parents from Iraq, she wrote: “Being a medic is what I live to do.”

Hugo was assigned to the 303rd Military Police Company, based in Jackson, Mich. The unit, which was deployed in September 2006, was responsible for providing security for convoy operations. “She was always very adamant about volunteering and going out on missions with her guys,” said her father, Kermit Hugo. “She told us countless times that she needed to be out there with them. If somebody got hurt or something and they didn’t have a medic, she was beside herself.”

He said his daughter was credited with saving the life of a sergeant who was badly wounded by a roadside bomb about three months into her tour. She was in the back of the convoy when the bomb exploded and jumped into action even though gunfire was going off, he said.

“She told the guys, ‘Cover me.’ She ran up there and started treating him,” Kermit Hugo said. “She just stayed with him and kept treating him, talking to him. She talked a lot to him to keep him alert. She did her job.” The man was taken away by a helicopter and is recovering from his injuries, thanks to her “quick thinking and her excellent training,” Kermit Hugo said.

During a news conference at an Army Reserve center, he pulled out of his pocket a commemorative coin his daughter received for her actions. She gave him the coin when she was in Madison on a two-week leave in May for her birthday. “She told me that she carried it with her wherever she went. She wanted to be sure that it didn’t get lost so she could bring it home to me and give it to me,” he said. “I’m just truly honored that my daughter would do something like that. Thinking of her family over herself. That’s just how she was.”

He said the coin — featuring his favorite colors of Green Bay Packers’ green and gold — would be proudly displayed in the family’s Madison home.

Hugo was studying to be a nurse at Viterbo University in La Crosse when she was called to active duty. She had two years of school remaining. Family members said she signed up for the military because she wanted to serve the country. Scott Hugo, 19, said his sister had a caring and serious side, but she also was one of the goofiest people he knew and was always pulling pranks on family members. Kermit Hugo, a custodian for the city of Madison, paused at the news conference to directly address his only daughter.

“Rachael, I always told you that you needed to be an asset to society and not a detriment and to give back to your community,” he said. “And you didn’t disappoint me. You made the ultimate sacrifice for your country.”

Source:  Military Times – HONOR THE FALLEN

Tony Carrasco

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army CPL. Tony Carrasco Jr.


Army CPL. Tony Carrasco Jr.

Tony Carrasco Jr.
Tony Carrasco Jr.

Died November 4, 2009 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

25, of Berino, N.M.; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 32nd Field Artillery Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan.; died Nov. 4 in Ad Dawr, Iraq, of a gunshot wound sustained when enemy forces attacked his unit.


Teachers say he was a hard-working student

The Associated Press

At Gadsden High School in Anthony, N.M., Tony Carrasco was remembered as a hard worker who didn’t cause problems.

“He was an ag student who was involved in the horticulture program here,” said principal Carey Chambers, who arrived at the school after Carrasco graduated but heard teachers’ memories of him. “By all accounts of everyone we talked to, he was a good kid.”

Army CPL. Tony Carrasco Jr.
Army CPL. Tony Carrasco Jr.

Carrasco, 25, of Berino, N.M., died Nov. 4 in Ad Dawr, Iraq, when he was shot during an attack. He was assigned to Fort Riley, Kan.

His sister, Susana, wrote in an online message board that she remembered her brother’s jokes and all the times he told her to be strong and not take life for granted.

“Those are the things that help me go on. I am very proud of you. You are my HERO!” she wrote.

Carrasco graduated from high school in 2003 and entered the Army in January 2008. A field artillery specialist, he deployed to Iraq earlier this fall.

He is survived by his wife, Johana Lizeth Martinez Gavaldon-Carrasco; stepson, Axel Antonio; stepdaughter, Ilse Iveth; parents, Antonio and Juana Carrasco; and sisters, Rosalia, Susana, and Jessica.


CPL Tony Carrosco Jr. Memorial

Cpl Tony Carrasco Jr., 25, of Berino, N.M.; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 32nd Field Artillery Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan.; died Nov. 4 in Ad Dawr, Iraq, of a gunshot wound sustained when enemy forces attacked his unit. He was killed in Ad Dawr, Iraq after being hit by sniper fire.

Army Spec. Tony Carrasco Jr., 25, born February 11, 1984 in Las Cruces, NM to Antonio and Juana Carrasco. Tony’s life was cut short while on deployment in Iraq.

Tony Carrasco Jr.
Tony Carrasco Jr.

Tony enlisted with the U.S. Army in January 2008 to serve his country. He was currently stationed in Ft. Riley, KS. Tony was a 2003 graduate of Gadsden High School.

Tony was a caring and loving young man with a heart as big as the world and a big smile to match. He was a loving son, brother, uncle and friend, always with a helping hand.

He was protective of his family and by joining the military he was also protective of his country.

Minhee Kim

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Marine Lance Cpl. Minhee Kim.


Marine Lance Cpl. Minhee Kim

Marine LCpl Minhee Kim
Marine LCpl Minhee Kim

Died November 1, 2006 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

20, of Ann Arbor, Mich.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 24th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division, Marine Forces Reserve, Lansing, Mich.; died Nov. 1 while conducting combat operations in Fallujah, Iraq.


Family, friends mourn A2 soldier slain in Iraq

Minhee Kim, a University of Michigan at Dearborn student, remembered at memorial event

By: Dave Mekelburg
Posted: 11/3/06

Every chair in the Anderson Room of the Michigan Union was filled last night. Those unable to find a seat lined the aisles and gathered at the back.

The sounds of stifled sobbing and crumpling tissues echoed through the room where family and friends had gathered to celebrate the life and mourn the death of Lance Cpl. Minhee Kim.

Kim, 20, died Wednesday in the Anbar province of Iraq. The Marine was a student at the University’s Dearborn campus. He had spent the last 10 years of his life as a resident of Ann Arbor. He had been in Iraq for only a few months.

In a eulogy, his brother, Isaac Kim, spoke about how his brother embraced life and those around him.

Once, when Isaac Kim and his brother were young, Minhee Kim came home with his knee covered in blood. Shocked and worried, his mother asked him what had happened. Kim was completely unfazed by the injury. He calmly told his mother he had hurt it diving for an errant ball in a pickup basketball game.

“He had no fear,” Isaac Kim said as he held back tears.

The speakers at last night’s memorial service painted a portrait of a young man deeply rooted in his faith and his community.

Marine LCpl Minhee Kim
Marine LCpl Minhee Kim

Before leaving for Iraq, Kim had spoken with Pastor Seth Kim of the Harvest Mission Community Church in Ann Arbor about joining the ministry when he returned. When Seth Kim asked Kim why he was joining the Marines, Kim said he wanted to serve his community and the country that had been had so good to him.

When Seth Kim heard those words, “it was a breath of fresh air,” he said.

Another friend told the story of when he and Kim met, playing recreational hockey. As the only Asian Americans on the team, they were drawn to each other. The two forged a friendship. They often stayed up late, jamming on guitars and talking about their faith.

Kim spent his first year of college at Purdue University before transferring to the University’s Dearborn campus last year.

While in Iraq, Kim sent his last e-mail to his friends, family and fellow congregation members exactly a month before he died. Seth Kim read from the e-mail during the service.

The letter said his unit had just arrived at the outskirts of Fallujah. He described the excitement and anxiety of finally seeing battle and wrote about how his faith had been strengthened by the experience.

As the service ended, tears welled in the eyes of nearly everyone in the room. Several people lingered in the room and outside the doors after it was over, hugging, consoling each other and helping to brush aside the tears.

Seth Kim said crying was a necessary part of the process, something that everyone has to go through. But the key, he said, is learning to take joy a the life that had ended so suddenly.

Emily Perez

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army 2nd Lt. Emily J.T. Perez.


Army 2nd Lt. Emily J.T. Perez

Emily J.T. Perez
Emily J.T. Perez

Died September 12, 2006 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

23, of Texas; assigned to 204th Support Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Hood, Texas; died Sept. 12 of injuries sustained when an improvised explosive device detonated near her Humvee during combat operations in Kifl, Iraq.

Source: Military Times


Army officer, 23, leapt high in life cut short by war

By Rona Marech
September 22, 206

Quick and intense. That’s how Emily J.T. Perez performed on the track, one coach said – and the same could be said for the rest of her short life. She was a star student and talented athlete. She was a captain of her high school track team and a leader at her alma mater, the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. She helped start an AIDS ministry at her church.

Army 2nd Lt Emily Perez
2nd Lt. Emily J.T. Perez died Sept. 12 after an improvised explosive detonated near her Humvee.

A 23-year-old soldier from Fort Washington in Prince George’s County, 2nd Lt. Emily J.T. Perez was killed while on duty in Al Kifl, Iraq, on Sept. 12. A Medical Service Corps officer, she died during combat after an improvised explosive device detonated near her Humvee, according to the Department of Defense.

“She was just the kind of kid you want your own children to be like,” said Joe Rogers, the assistant track coach at West Point.

“Emily, as far as I’m concerned, was one of the most brilliant people I ever met. She was the consummate intellectual,” said the Rev. Michael Bell, executive pastor at Peace Baptist Church in Washington. “But she was not the kind of person who was only book-oriented. … She always wanted to help someone, to help the community.”

When she was in high school, Lieutenant Perez was instrumental in starting the HIV/AIDS ministry at her church. She was also an HIV/AIDS educator with the Red Cross.

Her desire to help led to personal sacrifices: Shortly before shipping out to Iraq, Lieutenant Perez flew from Texas to Maryland to be a bone marrow donor to a stranger who was a match, Pastor Bell said.

Lieutenant Perez, who came from a military family, spent much of her youth in Germany. She returned to the United States in 1998 and graduated from Oxon Hill High School in 2001. She excelled at West Point, where she was a medal-winning athlete and a top-ranked cadet, said Jerry Quiller, the head track coach. She also had one of the highest grade-point averages of all the students on the track team, he said.

“You know the old advertisement – ‘Be all you can be,'” Mr. Quiller said. “You probably couldn’t do better than that.”

In her junior year, when the track team was sorely in need of a triple-jump competitor, Emily Perez – who had never attempted the event – volunteered to give it a try, Mr. Rogers said. She practiced the way she did everything, with intensity, and competed within a few weeks.

After a particularly good jump in an Army-Navy meet, she threw her arms around Mr. Rogers’ neck. “It was one of those spontaneous moments of joy for both of us,” he said.

Army 2nd Lt Emily Perez
Army 2nd Lt Emily Perez

That was Lieutenant Perez, friends said – bubbly, dedicated, talented, opinionated, confident.
Another West Point classmate, Tanesha Love, who sometimes sought tutoring help from Lieutenant Perez, said, “You could hear her laugh from probably miles away. There was no doubt in your mind who that was as soon as you heard it.”

Lieutenant Perez’s family is establishing a scholarship fund for African-American and Hispanic women who share the soldier’s passion for medical services and sociology.

Services will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at Ebenezer African Methodist Episcopal Church in Fort Washington. Lieutenant Perez will be buried Tuesday at the West Point cemetery in New York.

Survivors include her parents, Daniel and Vicki Perez of Fort Washington; and a brother, Kevyn, of Fayetteville, N.C.

Emily was the first female graduate of West Point to die in the Iraq Wardia, the first West Point graduate of the “Class of 9/11” to die in combat, and the first female African-American officer to die in combat.

Source: The Baltimore Sun

2018 3rd Issue Newsletter

Volume 15 Issue 3

Inside this issue:

  • Goodbyes are Never Easy
  • Troop Thanks
  • Donation Challenge
  • LHCP Welcomes New Treasurer
  • 2018 Sponsors (Sep— Dec)
  • Honorees for 3 rd Issue 2018
  • 2018 Sep-Dec Shipping Statistics
  • Unit Needs Continue

View and Print PDF Version


Goodbyes are Never Easy

It is with saddened hearts, but much love, that we say goodbye to our steadfast treasurer, Sharon Buck. After fourteen years of service to Landstuhl Hospital Care Project, Sharon has decided to step down.

Sharon came to LHCP in the beginning and has been the one and only treasurer all these years. She lent her expertise and effort in getting LHCP its non-profit status. She kept up with the special registrations needed for certain states. Basically, LHCP would never have been able to help all the people it has helped without Sharon working in the background!

The LHCP board will truly miss Sharon’s presence! “[Sharon’s] skills as a Treasurer are the best I have ever seen. She has been so faithful about keeping LHCP on the good side of the IRS. She stays up to date with the state registrations and all of the financial data… I would not have been able to complete the Annual Report each year without her attention to detail. I have thoroughly enjoyed working with her during my time with LHCP,” commented Donna Bolen, Vice President, when asked about Sharon. Karen Grimord, LHCP President, says, “It is a sad day. She has touched more lives than we can imagine.”

On a personal level, I worked with Sharon on the board for five years. She was so helpful and welcoming when I came in, knowing nothing. She’s such a lovely person, always giving of herself—above and beyond what is asked.

There is a silver lining in this cloud of goodbye, she’s not going far, Sharon will still stay a part of LHCP and continue to support our mission. Sharon, for all you’ve done, all you’ve given these many years, all of us at LHCP thank you from the bottom of our hearts!

Maria Waddell, Editor


Troop Thanks

How are you? Happy holidays!! I wanted to let you know that we have received all of your recent packages. It was a nice treat to receive the fleece blankets, coffee, flags and additional care packages. The soldiers and myself truly appreciate all of your team’s efforts with putting these together. If there is anything we can do in return to show our gratitude, please let me know. Thank you again.

Platoon Sergeant, FBS
DUSTOFF in Iraq


Donation Challenge

One of LHCP’s largest sponsors has set a challenge for all supporters. Through February 28, 2019, they will match every dollar contributed up
to $15,000! Please be generous in your donations! The amount of good that LHCP could do with $30,000 is unimaginable! See page 4 for where to send checks or how to donate online. Tell all your friends and family!

LHCP would love to have you or your organization sponsor a fundraising event to support the LHCP mission to provide comfort and care items to sick, injured or wounded military services members overseas. If your organization is interested, please contact Karen Grimord at 540-286-1512.


LHCP Welcomes New Treasurer

As we must say goodbye to our long-time Treasurer, Sharon, we get to say a big hello and welcome to Sherry Karlson! Sherry has been a supporter of LHCP for many years, but now she is stepping into the position of Treasurer.

Sherry grew up in Clinton MD, the oldest daughter of a Navy Veteran. She graduated High School in 1979 and met her husband in 1985 when he was stationed at the Pentagon. They married in March 1987. She moved around the world with her husband while he was stationed in Naples Italy, Travis Air Force Base (AFB) and Keesler AFB. At each duty station, she was involved in a variety of organization activities and was a mentor to younger families. In the summer of 1998, her husband retired from the Air Force and they settled in Woodbridge, VA

Looking for the sense of belonging that comes with the military lifestyle, she joined the American Legion Ladies Auxiliary in 2002. Sherry quickly became active and served as the 2nd Vice President where she was responsible for fundraising and was named as the “Lady of the Year” for the Auxiliary Unit. She subsequently served as 1 st Vice President where she was responsible for membership, and then the Unit President for the 1st of five separate terms of service. She has also been named the Auxiliary Lady of the
Year for the Department of Virginia in 2007-2008. She went on to serve as District President and Chairwomen of the Americanism committee for the Department of Virginia.

It’s obvious that Sherry has the fortitude and experience to be a tremendous support to LHCP as she steps into the position of Treasurer. Please be sure to send her a big welcome! You may reach her by email at treasurer@lhcp.us.


With Gratitude to Our Generous Sponsors

2018 Sponsors—September through December

Individuals and Families

Anderson, G., IN
Anderson, S., IN
Apycholski, C., MS
Arseculeratne, R., VA
Badgley, B., MI
Badgley, J., MI
Bath, M., AL
Bolen, D., SC
Breidel, G., MN
Buck, S., AL
Bujorian, R., TN
Burkel, D., MN
Byrnes, E., PA
Chan, C., CA
Clawson, D. & D., WI
Crist, M., TN
Driskill, T, TX
Eanes, L., VA
Elledge, C., MS
Gittelman, S., KS
Granquist, K., SD
Grimord, D., NC
Grimord, K., VA
Hansen, L., VA
Howard, R., VA
Jansen, S., MO
Javor, TN
Jones, S. & M., WI
Kelly, P., CA
Kuckuk, C., WI
Kurzenknabe, G., PA
Lambert, R., MD
Lane, D. & F., CA
Lienczewski, E., MI
Mann, A., NY
Marion, D., TX
May, D., KY
McAlister, J., TN
McCarthy, W., VA
McKay, A., AZ
Nelson, D., KS
Nichols, H., TN
O’Brien, B., PA
O’Neill, M., Unk.
Osgood, J., APO-AE
Ownby, L., TN
Pasternak, J., VA
Pemberton, J., MI
Pineau, B., France
Reynolds, M., OK
Rivers, C., AR
Roberts, R., TN
Sanders Family, Unk.
Sann, R., DC
Seljeskog, M., SD
Serafini, M., CT
Smith, E., FL
Waddell, C., NC
Spiedlt, J., ID
Waddell, M., NC
Stanley, L., MN
Steinman, M., NV
Weaver, J., TN
Wolfe, F., CA
Stutts, T., TN
Wolford, C., PA
Vasquez, S., T

Businesses and Organizations

Amer Leg Aux Unit 62, AZ
Amer Leg Aux Unit 180, VA
Amer Leg Aux Unit 290, VA
Amer Leg Aux Unit 364, VA
Amer Leg Aux Unit 428, WI
Amer Leg Aux Unit 1976, VA
Amer Leg Post 2, WI
Amer Leg Post 326, TX
Amer Leg Post 521, WI
Amer Leg Riders Post 189, NY
Benevity Fund, Canada
Betty Crocker, VA
Beyond the Call of Duty Ministries, FL
Brandl Farms, WI
Daughters of Amer Rev, TN
Doc’s Harley Davidson, WI
Gateway Technical College, WI
Girls Nation, IL
Goodshop, CA
Grace Chapel LLC, TN
Holy Family R. C. Congregation, IL
Hillsboro Athens LLC, TN
IHL Services Inc., TN
Network for Good, DC
Sons of American Legion Squadron 189, NY
Standard Textile, OH
United Way of California Region, CA
Wolf River HOG Chapter, W

Honorees for 3rd Issue 2018 Shipments

SeptemberOctober
Army Spc. Emilio J. CampoArmy Staff Sgt. Lex L. Lewis
Army Spc. Emilio J. Campo
Army Spc. Emilio J. Campo

Died 6 June 2011 while serving during Operation New Dawn. 20, of Madelia, MN., assigned to 1st Battalion, 7th Field Art. Reg, 2nd HB Combat Team, 1st Infantry Div., Fort Riley, KS.; died of wounds sustained when enemy forces attacked his unit with indirect fire in Baghdad.

Army Staff Sgt. Lex L. Lewis
Army Staff Sgt. Lex L. Lewis

Died 15 July 2011 while serving during OEF. 40, of Rapid City, SD.; assigned to 1st Squad, 10th Cavalry, 2nd Brig. Combat Team, 4th Inf Div, Fort Carson, CO; died in Afghanistan when insurgents attacked his unit with small-arms fire.

NovemberDecember
Army Spc. Mark J. DownerArmy Sgt. Aaron C. Elandt
Army Spc. Mark J. Downer
Army Spc. Mark J. Downer

Army Spc. Mark J. DownerDied 5 August 2011 while serving during OEF. 23, of Warner Robins, GA; a combat medic assigned to 1st Battalion, 32nd Inf Reg, 3rd Brig. Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Drum, NY; died in Afghanistan, when enemy forces attacked his unit with a rocket-propelled grenade.

Army Sgt. Aaron C. Elandt
Army Sgt. Aaron C. Elandt

Died 30 May 2004 while serving during OIF. 23, of Lowell, MI.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 1st Armored Division, Baumholder, Germany; killed when his vehicle hit an improvised explosive device in Musayyib, Iraq.


2018 Sept-Dec Shipping Statistics

CountryWeightCostBoxes Shipped
Afghanistan328.93$593.45 11
Germany3,064.03$3,150.80249
Iraq274.60$449.408
Qatar1,121.26$1,868.5535
Syria793.50$1,612.8034
Other111.72$113.523
Total5,694.04$7,788.52340

MONETARY DONATIONS MADE EASY!

Now you can make a monetary donation so easy using PayPal! Go to PayPal.com and send your donation to treasurer@lhcp.us and type in Landstuhl Hospital Care Project when asked for a name. Please include your address. We will send a letter of thanks for your tax-deductible donation.


Unit Needs Continue

At this time, LHCP is placing focus on receiving monetary donations. Unit needs are fluid, and we can quickly respond using cash donations to purchase requested items.

Please make checks payable to the Landstuhl Hospital Care Project.

Please mail your packages and/or checks to:

LHCP President
Attn: Karen Grimord
29 Greenleaf Terrace
Stafford, VA 22556

LHCP is a 501 (c) (3) tax-exempt non-profit organization.

Richard Berrettini

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini


Army Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini

Richard J. Berrettini
Richard J. Berrettini

Died January 11, 2008, Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom

52, of Wilcox, Pa.; assigned to the Pennsylvania Army National Guard Medical Detachment, Erie Clinic, Erie, Pa.; died Jan. 11 in San Antonio of wounds sustained Jan. 2 in Khowst province, Afghanistan when his vehicle encountered an improvised explosive device.


Guardsman dies from injuries sustained in Afghanistan

The Associated Press

HARRISBURG, Pa. — A soldier has died in Texas from combat injuries he suffered in Afghanistan, the Pennsylvania Army National Guard announced Jan. 13.

Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini, 52, from Eldred, McKean County, died Jan. 11, nine days after the attack, which also killed an interpreter and South Carolina National Guard Sgt. Shawn F. Hill, 37, of Wellford, S.C.

Berrettini was scheduled to return home at the end of the month after a year in Afghanistan. A nurse practitioner, he had volunteered to serve in Afghanistan. In civilian life, Berrettini was a Port Allegany High School nurse.

He joined the Pennsylvania National Guard in 1984 and was a former active duty sailor.

“He was a very good man, very professional, somebody, they trusted,” said retired teacher Ron Caskey, a former colleague of Berrettini’s. “He was a confidante.”

Tony Flint, Port Allegany superintendent of schools, said Berrettini had been an elementary school nurse for seven years before becoming a nurse at the high school, where he also worked for seven years.

Berrettini, who died at Brooke Army Medical Center, is survived by his wife, Jane; mother, Doris; brother, Nello; and sons Vincent, 26, and Christopher, 22.

Vincent Berrettini is an Air Force Academy graduate and an Air Force pilot. Christopher Berrettini is a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y.

Source: Military Times


Nurse Killed in Afghanistan Bombing

Pennsylvania school nurse had nearly finished tour of duty.

Author – Jennifer Moser

Army Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini
Army Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini

Lieutenant Colonel Richard J. Berrettini, RN, CRNP, 52, of the Army National Guard, died January 11 of injuries he sustained while serving at Camp Clark in Khowst, Afghanistan. Berrettini, of Eldred, Pennsylvania, was a school nurse in nearby Port Allegany. Injured in a roadside bombing January 2, Berrettini was flown to medical centers in Germany and then Texas, where he died.

“He just had a way about him that would put people at ease,” said Andrew Barrett, ANP-BC, a former coworker at the ED of Bradford Regional Medical Center in Bradford, Pennsylvania. Berrettini had a great sense of humor and great nursing skills, said Brian Benjamin, LPN, also of Bradford Regional. Asked for his favorite memory of Berrettini, Benjamin sighed. “I only have about a million of them,” he said.

Berrettini spent 15 years as a school nurse in elementary and high schools. In Afghanistan, he cared for Camp Clark personnel and for Afghan citizens, especially children. He had nearly completed his one-year tour of duty when he was injured; two others died and one other was injured in the blast. Berrettini is survived by his wife and two grown sons.

Captain David J. McDill, who served with Berrettini at Camp Clark, said, “He hated me saluting him, but I did it because it’s a sign of respect. And he earned mine.

Source: NursingCenter.com

 

 

LHCP Reaches GuideStar Platinum

Allows Donors to Focus on Progress and Results

GuideStar USA
GuideStar USA

STAFFORD, VA—Landstuhl Hospital Care Project has earned the 2018 Platinum GuideStar Nonprofit Profile Seal of Transparency, the highest level of recognition offered by GuideStar, the world’s largest source of nonprofit information. By sharing metrics that highlight progress Landstuhl Hospital Care Project (LHCP) is making toward its mission, the organization is helping donors move beyond simplistic ways of nonprofit evaluation such as overhead ratios.

In accordance with LHCP’s long-held belief in being transparent about our work,  we are excited to convey our organization’s results in a user-friendly and highly visual manner. By updating our GuideStar Nonprofit Profile to the Platinum level, we can now easily share a wealth of up-to-date organizational metrics with our supporters as well as GuideStar’s immense online audience, which includes donors, grantmakers, our peers, and the media.”

To reach the Platinum level, the Landstuhl Hospital Care Project added extensive information to its Nonprofit Profile on GuideStar: basic contact and organizational information; in-depth financial information; qualitative information about goals, strategies, and capabilities; and quantitative information about results and progress toward its mission. By taking the time to provide this information, LHCP has demonstrated its commitment to transparency and to giving donors and funders meaningful data to evaluate Landstuhl Hospital Care Project.

The Landstuhl Hospital Care Project encourages you to visit our profile on GuideStar to see what we’re all about,” LHCP is thrilled that our GuideStar Platinum Nonprofit Profile and its associated benefits help us better communicate our organization’s exciting initiatives at a global scale.”

Since 2005 the Landstuhl Hospital Care Project has been providing comfort and relief items for U.S. military members who become sick, injured or wounded from service and deployed members around the globe.

About GuideStar Nonprofit Profiles

The GuideStar database contains a profile for every tax-exempt nonprofit registered with the IRS. GuideStar encourages every nonprofit to claim and update its profile at no cost to the organization. Updating allows nonprofits to share a wealth of up-to-date information with more than 8 million people who visit GuideStar to learn more about nonprofit organizations each year. Updating also allows nonprofits to share information with the more than 200 philanthropic websites and applications that are powered by GuideStar data. To reach a given participation level, organizations need to complete all required fields for that participation level. The GuideStar participation levels acknowledged as symbols of transparency in the nonprofit sector are displayed on all updated participants’ profiles in the GuideStar database.

PDF Download

News Contact:

President Karen Grimord
29 Greenleaf Terrace
Stafford, VA 22556
(877) 999-8322
president@lhcp.us
www.LandstuhlHospitalCareProject.org

Donation Request

Landstuhl Hospital Care Project Fund Raiser  (download PDF)

Landstuhl Hospital Care Project
29 Greenleaf Terrace
Stafford, VA 22556
540-286-1512

Dear Friend,

Once again, we are asking for your help. We are seeking donations to help us fulfill our mission to provide comfort and care items to Soldiers, Sailors Airmen, and Marines who become wounded, sick, or injured and the medical staff caring for them. LHCP is currently supporting nine units, deployed in combat areas, by assisting them with comfort and care items.

Our major contributor has presented LHCP and its sponsors with a challenge for increasing donations over the next two months. They have committed to match every dollar that we raise from now until 28 February 2019 up to $15,000. We could possibly raise $30,000 by the end of February  2019 if we can meet this challenge.

Please consider making a donation to help us meet our mission needs and to support our men and women in uniform. You can donate through the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) that continues through the middle of January 2019. If asked to donate to the CFC at work, please consider supporting LHCP. Our designation code is 12282.

Have you considered making a monthly pledge? No donation is too small. It will be matched 100%. Please send your donation to:

Landstuhl Hospital Care Project
29 Greenleaf Terrace
Stafford, VA 22556

You can donate online in several ways. PayPal is easy. Go to www.paypal.com and send your donation to treasurer@LHCP.US and then type in Landstuhl Hospital Care Project. If you visit our website, you can donate through Click and Pledge or Give Direct. In addition, we accept vehicle donations as a tax-deductible donation. Moreover, when you order from Amazon, please list Landstuhl Hospital Care Project as your charity through Amazon Smile and a percentage of your order will be donated to LHCP. Every one of these methods will be matched 100%.

Finally, please ask at work how you can donate through corporate matching programs established with your workplace giving programs. Many times corporations will match your donation 100%. Then our contributor will match that 100%. It is a “win-win” for LHCP and the troops we support. With your generosity, LHCP will be able to continue to provide comfort and care to our many service members serving our country so far from home.

Thank you in advance for your generosity.

Very respectfully,
Sharon Buck
LHCP Treasurer

LHCP is a 2018 Combined Federal Campaign Charity (CFC.) Code #12282

In accordance with IRS requirements, we acknowledge that no goods or services of significant value were given to you in exchange for your support. Donations to Landstuhl Hospital Care Project (LHCP) are tax-deductible under Section 501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code. LHCP will never sell, trade, or share your personal information with any other entity, nor send mailings on behalf of other organizations without your express consent. Supporting America’s Largest Overseas U. S. Military Hospital and Combat Support Hospitals in Afghanistan and the Middle East LHCP is a 501(c) (3) tax-exempt, nonprofit charitable organization.

Download PDF

Aaron Elandt

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army Sgt. Aaron C. Elandt.


Army Sgt. Aaron C. Elandt

Died May 30, 2004 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

23, of Lowell, Mich.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 1st Armored Division, Baumholder, Germany; killed May 30 when his vehicle hit an improvised explosive device in Musayyib, Iraq.


Michigan soldier killed in Iraq

PORT HOPE, Mich. — A Michigan man was killed in a land mine blast in Iraq, the Department of Defense and his family said.

Army Sgt. Aaron C. Elandt
Army Sgt. Aaron C. Elandt

Sgt. Aaron Elandt, 23, of Port Hope, died Sunday evening when the Humvee he was in struck a land mine while responding to a mortar attack, his brother Matt Elandt said. The explosion happened in Musayyib, Iraq, south of Baghdad.

“My favorite word for him was irreverent,” his mother, Linda Elandt, told the Detroit Free Press for a Wednesday story. “He did his own thing.”

Elandt was a cavalry scout with the 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 1st Armored Division and had been in Iraq for about 14 months. Lt. Col. Diane Battaglia, with the Army Public Affairs office, said Elandt’s death will be investigated, as is the case with every soldier’s death in Iraq.

The youngest of four children, he joined the military in 2000 after graduating from Harbor Beach High School in 1999.

He followed a family tradition started by his father, Paul Elandt, who served two years in Vietnam. His older sister and two older brothers also served in the Army.

Paul Elandt, 58, said he encouraged his son to travel and broaden his horizons.

“Linda said, ‘I can’t stand another one in the military.’ I told them get out of Huron County and see a bit of the world,” he said.

Harbor Beach Community Schools Superintendent Ron Kraft called Elandt “a courageous young man” dedicated to serving his country.

Aaron Elandt
Aaron Elandt

“He was a solid young man as a student and as a citizen,” Kraft told the Huron Daily Tribune of Bad Axe. “Our prayers and condolences go to his family during this very trying time.”

At the bar in the Port Hope Hotel, residents of the tiny community in Michigan’s Thumb mourned the death of one of their own.

Jim Hunley, 56, of Port Hope, said his son graduated from high school with Elandt.

“I’m just shocked, but that’s what he wanted to do and he gave it his all. He was a good kid. He never got into trouble. He just said, ‘It’s my time to go and serve my country,”’ Hunley said.

Sources:

Mark J. Downer

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army Spc. Mark J. Downer.


Army Spc. Mark J. Downer

Died August 5, 2011 Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom

23, of Warner Robins, Ga.; a combat medic was assigned to 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Drum, N.Y.; died Aug. 5 in Sangsar, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained when enemy forces attacked his unit with a rocket-propelled grenade.


‘He always did what was best for others’

WARNER ROBINS, Ga. — Mourners packed a church here Aug. 13 as a 23-year-old soldier killed in Afghanistan was mourned and remembered by family and friends in his hometown.

More than 200 people attended the funeral service for Army Spc. Mark J. Downer, a combat medic who died Aug. 5 in a rocket-propelled grenade attack in Kandahar province.

Army Spc. Mark J. Downer
Army Spc. Mark J. Downer

“He always did what was best for others,” Downer’s aunt, Sandra Downer, said during the service. “The profession he chose — to be a medic — was a dangerous one, and he’s a very intelligent young man, so he knew the danger that would befall him, but he did it anyway. He strived to do his best.”

Downer joined the Army in 2009, according to the Macon (Ga.) Telegraph. He was assigned to the 10th Mountain Division, Fort Drum, N.Y.

People lined the streets a day before the funeral as police escorted the hearse carrying Downer’s casket after it arrived in Warner Robins.

During the funeral, the soldier’s father, Garfield Downer, was presented with two medals — the Purple Heart and Bronze Star — awarded to his fallen son.

Family and friends remembered Downer as quiet. He graduated in 2005 from Northside High School, where he played football and ran track.

A former classmate, Courtney Chaplin, described Downer as funny, loving and selfless.


 

Army Spc. Mark J. Downer Warner Robins soldier dies in rocket attack in Afghanistan

Army Spc. Mark J. Downer
Army Spc. Mark J. Downer

A U.S. Army combat medic from Warner Robins died after insurgents attacked in Afghanistan, the U.S. Department of Defense announced Saturday.

Spc. Mark J. Downer, 23, died Friday of his wounds in Kandahar province. He had been injured when his unit was attacked with a rocket-propelled grenade.

He is survived by a child, his mother and his father, according to an official with the Fort Drum, N.Y.-based 10th Mountain Division. Downer served in the division’s 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team.

Downer joined the Army in December 2009 and was trained in Fort Sill, Okla., and Fort Sam Houston, Texas. He came to Fort Drum in June 2010 and deployed with his unit in March to support Operation Enduring Freedom.
His awards and decorations include the National Defense Service Medal, the Afghanistan Campaign Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, the Army Service Ribbon, the NATO Medal and the Combat Medic Badge.

Sources:

Lex Lewis

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army Staff Sgt. Lex L. Lewis.


Army Staff Sgt. Lex L. Lewis

Died July 15, 2011 Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom

40, of Rapid City, S.D.; assigned to 1st Squadron, 10th Cavalry, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson, Colo.; died July 15 at Shewan Garrison, Farah province, Afghanistan, from injuries suffered when insurgents attacked his unit with small-arms fire.


South Dakota soldier killed in Afghanistan laid to rest

RAPID CITY, S.D. – Army Staff Sergeant Lex Lewis of Rapid City was buried at Black Hills National Cemetery.

Army Staff Sgt. Lex L. Lewis
Army Staff Sgt. Lex L. Lewis

The 40-year-old Lewis was killed July 15th when insurgents shot at his unit in Farah Province. The recipient of a Purple Heart, Bronze Star, and Combat Action Badge, Lewis was a cavalry scout with the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division.

KOTA-TV reports that a group of onlookers and Rapid City firefighters overlooked the funeral procession. Lewis’ body was carried from Calvary Lutheran Church to its final resting place at Black Hills National Cemetery on Thursday.

Lewis was in the first month of his third war deployment to the Middle East. His previous two deployments were to Iraq.


Rapid City soldier killed in Afghanistan

A Rapid City mother heard the ring of a doorbell this weekend that every military family dreads.

At the door were members of the Army’s casualty notification team with news that her son Lex had been killed Friday while fighting in Afghanistan. “I never dreamt I’d hear that sound and open the door to that news,” his mother, Betty Lewis of Rapid City, said Sunday. “He was a wonderful son. I’m so proud of him.”

Army Staff Sgt. Lex L. Lewis
Army Staff Sgt. Lex L. Lewis

Sgt. Lex Lewis, 40, of Rapid City was a cavalry scout with the 1st Squadron, 10th Cavalry, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, out of Fort Carson, Colo., supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. Lewis died from injuries suffered Friday, when insurgents attacked his unit with small-arms fire in Farah province, Afghanistan. The U.S. Department of Defense announced his death Sunday.

Lewis is the second service member from Rapid City to die in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the 24th South Dakotan killed since 2001, according to Defense Department records.

After attending Rapid City Central High School, Lewis, a Rapid City native, started his military career in the Navy and was stationed in Japan. After finishing an enlistment, he immediately enrolled in the Army in 1999.

“He absolutely loved the Army, and the Army life fit him well. He wanted to serve his country,” Betty Lewis said Sunday. “He just liked being a soldier. He played Army when he was little boy all the time, and this is what he wanted to do.”

After a first tour in Iraq from April 2003 to July 2004, Lewis returned to Rapid City, where he worked as a security guard at Ellsworth Air Force Base. Soon after, he re-enlisted in the Army and deployed on a second tour to Iraq, from September 2008 to September 2009.

Lewis was on his first deployment to Afghanistan with the unit that deployed only last month. He is the brigade’s first casualty.

The 3,800-soldier 2nd Brigade deployed to Afghanistan in June, replacing the 1st Brigade Combat Team, according to a report in the Colorado Springs Gazette. It is working in Farah province, in western Afghanistan, near the Iranian border, to clear out insurgents. The unit has been working with NATO partners including Italy and Spain.

Lewis is survived by his mother, Betty, his wife, Molly Lewis, and a 6-year-old stepdaughter, Ariel, both of Colorado Springs, Colo. Lewis has a stepbrother, Frank McCormick of Kaysville, Utah, and a half-sister, Lacy, of Florida.

South Dakota governor Dennis Daugaard offered condolences Sunday afternoon after hearing of Lewis’ death.

“It is a tragedy to lose Sgt. Lewis, and my deepest sympathies go out to his loved ones,” Daugaard said in a prepared statement. “Many brave men and women risk their lives, every day, to protect our freedoms, and we grieve each time one of these heroes makes the ultimate sacrifice. Linda and I are praying for Sgt. Lewis’ family, and for the safe return of all those who serve our nation overseas.”

Lewis’s decorations include the Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal, NATO Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, South West Asia Service Medal and National Defense Service Medal.

Sources: