Brian K. Lundy Jr.

 

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Brian K. Lundy.


Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Brian K. Lundy

Brian K. Lundy Jr.
Brian K. Lundy Jr.

Died September 9, 2011 Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom

25, of Austin, Texas; assigned to 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 5, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.; died while conducting a dismounted patrol in Marjah, Helmand province, Afghanistan, on Sept. 9.


Petty Officer 2nd Class Brian Keith Lundy, Jr.

Brian earned his heavenly wings on September 9, 2011. In the ever so brief 25 years that Brian was on this earth, he led a full and meaningful life. It began with his birth to Ramona Fowler and Brian Lundy Sr. at Bergstrom AFB, TX on July 29, 1986. Brian accepted Christ at an early age and was baptized by Rev. R.E. Foster at Zion Rest Missionary Baptist Church. He sang with the Voices of Joy and was an active member of TCIA and JCIA Youth groups. He was also a Jr. Deacon and early on demonstrated an eagerness to serve.

Brian had a passion for animals and as a young child spoke of being a veterinarian. He loved his Great Danes, his iguana and his parrot (who now resides with Brian’s mother). Brian loved motorcycles, which fulfilled his need to live on the edge and his need to go fast. Many of Brian’s friends witnessed his impulsiveness while experiencing his passion for nature and mankind. Good times were always guaranteed when Brian was around. Brian graduated from Bowie High School in May 2004. One of the fondest memories of Brian at Bowie High School was his participation in the Mr. Bowie Bulldog contest.

Even then Brian demonstrated signs of his outgoing personality. Brian received a scholarship to Huston Tillotson University and enrolled in August 2004. During this period of his life, he determined college did not provide the challenge and adventure that he was seeking so he decided on a different path.

Brian K. Lundy
Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Brian K. Lundy

Determined to fulfill this burning desire to do more with his life, help others, and serve his country, he enlisted in the United States Navy in May 2006. During Brian’s enlistment in the United States Navy, he successfully completed Basic Training and Hospital Corpsman “A” School in Great Lakes, Illinois. His first duty station was aboard the Aircraft Carrier USS Ronald Reagan from November 2006 to August 2008. His next assignment was the Naval Hospital 29 Palms, California from December 2008 to December 2010.

However, these past assignments still did not challenge Brian to his full potential. So once eligible, he applied for and was accepted to Special Training as a Hospital Corpsman with the Fleet Marine Force. Fleet Marine Force training consists of specialized training in advanced emergency medicine and the fundamentals of Marine Corps life, while emphasizing physical conditioning, small arms familiarity, and basic battlefield tactics. He went on to train for Fleet Marine Forces (FMF) in January 2011 and successfully completed FMF training in March 2011. After successful completion of this training, he was assigned to 2nd Marine Division, Fleet Marine Force, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina in March 2011.

He then deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom to Afghanistan in July 2011. Brian often called his mother Ramona (“Mama”) detailing interesting stories about his duties as a Corpsman. He told her about having to deliver a baby, treating an Afghani National with multiple stab wounds, and even having to remove a rock from the eye of a young Afghanistan boy. Brian had finally found his calling and his purpose in life, and he was doing something that made him feel that he was making a difference in this world.

Ramona delighted in the fact that her little “Peanut” had become a man. Unfortunately, his acts of heroism were cut short after his life was taken while conducting a dismounted patrol at 11:44 A.M. (Afghanistan time) on September 9, 2011. At that moment a bright and shining star went dim.
However, the most rewarding commendation Brian ever received was the opportunity to help others and to give his life in the service of his country.

Rachael Hugo

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army Cpl. Rachael L. Hugo.


Army Cpl. Rachael L. Hugo

Rachael L. Hugo
Rachael L. Hugo

Died October 5, 2007 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

24, of Madison, Wis.; assigned to the 303rd Military Police Company, 97th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade, U.S. Army Reserve, Jackson, Mich.; died Oct. 5 in Bayji, Iraq, of wounds sustained when insurgents attacked her unit using an improvised explosive device and small-arms fire.


Madison soldier killed in Iraq described as volunteer

The Associated Press

MADISON, Wis. — The Madison soldier killed last week in Iraq kept volunteering to go out with the troops when she could have stayed back on base, a great uncle says.

“That’s the kind of person she was,” Robert Hugo said of Army Reserve Spc. Rachael Hugo, 24, of Madison.

Army Cpl. Rachael L. Hugo
Army Cpl. Rachael L. Hugo

The Defense Department said Oct. 6 she died Oct. 5 when insurgents attacked her unit using an improvised explosive device and small-arms fire. She was assigned to the 303rd Military Police Company based in Jackson, Mich. The 88th Regional Readiness Command of the Reserves said her parents, Kermit and Ruth Hugo, would hold a news conference Oct. 8 in Madison that will also be attended by her brother, Scott.

Juanita Davis, 21, who described herself as a friend of the soldier, said Hugo had been working toward a bachelor’s degree in nursing at Viterbo University in La Crosse before she was deployed to Iraq a little more than a year ago. “She would do anything for anybody,” Davis said. “Her heart was always in everything that she did.”

Davis described her friend’s job in Iraq as combat medic. While “I knew she didn’t like being there … she knew that she was there to serve her country,” Davis added. She said Hugo would have returned to Viterbo after her deployment ended.

As a part-time certified home health aide for the La Crosse County Health department, Hugo would visit homebound patients to help with daily health needs, said Gwen Loveless, a former co-worker. “She was excellent with everybody,” Loveless said. “She worked so hard.

I wish I had her drive.” Hugo also worked at Meriter Hospital in Madison as a nursing assistant in the hospital’s mobile unit, according to Sue Simo, one of her supervisors there. Simo said Hugo would work at Meriter during breaks from school. “She was a lovely young woman, mature beyond her age,” Simo said.


Parents: Medic killed in Iraq had saved a soldier’s life

By Ryan J. Foley, The Associated Press

MADISON, Wis. — A Madison woman killed in Iraq last week had won an award for saving another soldier’s life earlier in her tour, her parents said Oct. 8.

Spc. Rachael Hugo, 24, was killed Oct. 5 when her Army Reserve unit was attacked by insurgents with a roadside bomb and small-arms fire, military officials said. She was serving as a combat medic with a Michigan-based unit expected to return to the U.S. in about a month.

Sgt. Maj. Janet Jones, a spokeswoman for the Army Reserve, said she believed Hugo was treating another soldier when she was killed during the incident in Bayji, Iraq. She said details were sketchy and an investigation into her death was underway.

Rachael L. Hugo
Rachael L. Hugo

The former high school cheerleader was looking forward to coming home and had even gone on an online shopping spree for new clothes, said her mother, Ruth Hugo. Her parents and her little brother remembered Hugo as a beautiful and intelligent woman who had a passion for caring for the wounded. In an e-mail to her parents from Iraq, she wrote: “Being a medic is what I live to do.”

Hugo was assigned to the 303rd Military Police Company, based in Jackson, Mich. The unit, which was deployed in September 2006, was responsible for providing security for convoy operations. “She was always very adamant about volunteering and going out on missions with her guys,” said her father, Kermit Hugo. “She told us countless times that she needed to be out there with them. If somebody got hurt or something and they didn’t have a medic, she was beside herself.”

He said his daughter was credited with saving the life of a sergeant who was badly wounded by a roadside bomb about three months into her tour. She was in the back of the convoy when the bomb exploded and jumped into action even though gunfire was going off, he said.

“She told the guys, ‘Cover me.’ She ran up there and started treating him,” Kermit Hugo said. “She just stayed with him and kept treating him, talking to him. She talked a lot to him to keep him alert. She did her job.” The man was taken away by a helicopter and is recovering from his injuries, thanks to her “quick thinking and her excellent training,” Kermit Hugo said.

During a news conference at an Army Reserve center, he pulled out of his pocket a commemorative coin his daughter received for her actions. She gave him the coin when she was in Madison on a two-week leave in May for her birthday. “She told me that she carried it with her wherever she went. She wanted to be sure that it didn’t get lost so she could bring it home to me and give it to me,” he said. “I’m just truly honored that my daughter would do something like that. Thinking of her family over herself. That’s just how she was.”

He said the coin — featuring his favorite colors of Green Bay Packers’ green and gold — would be proudly displayed in the family’s Madison home.

Hugo was studying to be a nurse at Viterbo University in La Crosse when she was called to active duty. She had two years of school remaining. Family members said she signed up for the military because she wanted to serve the country. Scott Hugo, 19, said his sister had a caring and serious side, but she also was one of the goofiest people he knew and was always pulling pranks on family members. Kermit Hugo, a custodian for the city of Madison, paused at the news conference to directly address his only daughter.

“Rachael, I always told you that you needed to be an asset to society and not a detriment and to give back to your community,” he said. “And you didn’t disappoint me. You made the ultimate sacrifice for your country.”

Source:  Military Times – HONOR THE FALLEN

Tony Carrasco

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army CPL. Tony Carrasco Jr.


Army CPL. Tony Carrasco Jr.

Tony Carrasco Jr.
Tony Carrasco Jr.

Died November 4, 2009 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

25, of Berino, N.M.; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 32nd Field Artillery Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan.; died Nov. 4 in Ad Dawr, Iraq, of a gunshot wound sustained when enemy forces attacked his unit.


Teachers say he was a hard-working student

The Associated Press

At Gadsden High School in Anthony, N.M., Tony Carrasco was remembered as a hard worker who didn’t cause problems.

“He was an ag student who was involved in the horticulture program here,” said principal Carey Chambers, who arrived at the school after Carrasco graduated but heard teachers’ memories of him. “By all accounts of everyone we talked to, he was a good kid.”

Army CPL. Tony Carrasco Jr.
Army CPL. Tony Carrasco Jr.

Carrasco, 25, of Berino, N.M., died Nov. 4 in Ad Dawr, Iraq, when he was shot during an attack. He was assigned to Fort Riley, Kan.

His sister, Susana, wrote in an online message board that she remembered her brother’s jokes and all the times he told her to be strong and not take life for granted.

“Those are the things that help me go on. I am very proud of you. You are my HERO!” she wrote.

Carrasco graduated from high school in 2003 and entered the Army in January 2008. A field artillery specialist, he deployed to Iraq earlier this fall.

He is survived by his wife, Johana Lizeth Martinez Gavaldon-Carrasco; stepson, Axel Antonio; stepdaughter, Ilse Iveth; parents, Antonio and Juana Carrasco; and sisters, Rosalia, Susana, and Jessica.


CPL Tony Carrosco Jr. Memorial

Cpl Tony Carrasco Jr., 25, of Berino, N.M.; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 32nd Field Artillery Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan.; died Nov. 4 in Ad Dawr, Iraq, of a gunshot wound sustained when enemy forces attacked his unit. He was killed in Ad Dawr, Iraq after being hit by sniper fire.

Army Spec. Tony Carrasco Jr., 25, born February 11, 1984 in Las Cruces, NM to Antonio and Juana Carrasco. Tony’s life was cut short while on deployment in Iraq.

Tony Carrasco Jr.
Tony Carrasco Jr.

Tony enlisted with the U.S. Army in January 2008 to serve his country. He was currently stationed in Ft. Riley, KS. Tony was a 2003 graduate of Gadsden High School.

Tony was a caring and loving young man with a heart as big as the world and a big smile to match. He was a loving son, brother, uncle and friend, always with a helping hand.

He was protective of his family and by joining the military he was also protective of his country.

Minhee Kim

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Marine Lance Cpl. Minhee Kim.


Marine Lance Cpl. Minhee Kim

Marine LCpl Minhee Kim
Marine LCpl Minhee Kim

Died November 1, 2006 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

20, of Ann Arbor, Mich.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 24th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division, Marine Forces Reserve, Lansing, Mich.; died Nov. 1 while conducting combat operations in Fallujah, Iraq.


Family, friends mourn A2 soldier slain in Iraq

Minhee Kim, a University of Michigan at Dearborn student, remembered at memorial event

By: Dave Mekelburg
Posted: 11/3/06

Every chair in the Anderson Room of the Michigan Union was filled last night. Those unable to find a seat lined the aisles and gathered at the back.

The sounds of stifled sobbing and crumpling tissues echoed through the room where family and friends had gathered to celebrate the life and mourn the death of Lance Cpl. Minhee Kim.

Kim, 20, died Wednesday in the Anbar province of Iraq. The Marine was a student at the University’s Dearborn campus. He had spent the last 10 years of his life as a resident of Ann Arbor. He had been in Iraq for only a few months.

In a eulogy, his brother, Isaac Kim, spoke about how his brother embraced life and those around him.

Once, when Isaac Kim and his brother were young, Minhee Kim came home with his knee covered in blood. Shocked and worried, his mother asked him what had happened. Kim was completely unfazed by the injury. He calmly told his mother he had hurt it diving for an errant ball in a pickup basketball game.

“He had no fear,” Isaac Kim said as he held back tears.

The speakers at last night’s memorial service painted a portrait of a young man deeply rooted in his faith and his community.

Marine LCpl Minhee Kim
Marine LCpl Minhee Kim

Before leaving for Iraq, Kim had spoken with Pastor Seth Kim of the Harvest Mission Community Church in Ann Arbor about joining the ministry when he returned. When Seth Kim asked Kim why he was joining the Marines, Kim said he wanted to serve his community and the country that had been had so good to him.

When Seth Kim heard those words, “it was a breath of fresh air,” he said.

Another friend told the story of when he and Kim met, playing recreational hockey. As the only Asian Americans on the team, they were drawn to each other. The two forged a friendship. They often stayed up late, jamming on guitars and talking about their faith.

Kim spent his first year of college at Purdue University before transferring to the University’s Dearborn campus last year.

While in Iraq, Kim sent his last e-mail to his friends, family and fellow congregation members exactly a month before he died. Seth Kim read from the e-mail during the service.

The letter said his unit had just arrived at the outskirts of Fallujah. He described the excitement and anxiety of finally seeing battle and wrote about how his faith had been strengthened by the experience.

As the service ended, tears welled in the eyes of nearly everyone in the room. Several people lingered in the room and outside the doors after it was over, hugging, consoling each other and helping to brush aside the tears.

Seth Kim said crying was a necessary part of the process, something that everyone has to go through. But the key, he said, is learning to take joy a the life that had ended so suddenly.

Emily Perez

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army 2nd Lt. Emily J.T. Perez.


Army 2nd Lt. Emily J.T. Perez

Emily J.T. Perez
Emily J.T. Perez

Died September 12, 2006 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

23, of Texas; assigned to 204th Support Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Hood, Texas; died Sept. 12 of injuries sustained when an improvised explosive device detonated near her Humvee during combat operations in Kifl, Iraq.

Source: Military Times


Army officer, 23, leapt high in life cut short by war

By Rona Marech
September 22, 206

Quick and intense. That’s how Emily J.T. Perez performed on the track, one coach said – and the same could be said for the rest of her short life. She was a star student and talented athlete. She was a captain of her high school track team and a leader at her alma mater, the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. She helped start an AIDS ministry at her church.

Army 2nd Lt Emily Perez
2nd Lt. Emily J.T. Perez died Sept. 12 after an improvised explosive detonated near her Humvee.

A 23-year-old soldier from Fort Washington in Prince George’s County, 2nd Lt. Emily J.T. Perez was killed while on duty in Al Kifl, Iraq, on Sept. 12. A Medical Service Corps officer, she died during combat after an improvised explosive device detonated near her Humvee, according to the Department of Defense.

“She was just the kind of kid you want your own children to be like,” said Joe Rogers, the assistant track coach at West Point.

“Emily, as far as I’m concerned, was one of the most brilliant people I ever met. She was the consummate intellectual,” said the Rev. Michael Bell, executive pastor at Peace Baptist Church in Washington. “But she was not the kind of person who was only book-oriented. … She always wanted to help someone, to help the community.”

When she was in high school, Lieutenant Perez was instrumental in starting the HIV/AIDS ministry at her church. She was also an HIV/AIDS educator with the Red Cross.

Her desire to help led to personal sacrifices: Shortly before shipping out to Iraq, Lieutenant Perez flew from Texas to Maryland to be a bone marrow donor to a stranger who was a match, Pastor Bell said.

Lieutenant Perez, who came from a military family, spent much of her youth in Germany. She returned to the United States in 1998 and graduated from Oxon Hill High School in 2001. She excelled at West Point, where she was a medal-winning athlete and a top-ranked cadet, said Jerry Quiller, the head track coach. She also had one of the highest grade-point averages of all the students on the track team, he said.

“You know the old advertisement – ‘Be all you can be,'” Mr. Quiller said. “You probably couldn’t do better than that.”

In her junior year, when the track team was sorely in need of a triple-jump competitor, Emily Perez – who had never attempted the event – volunteered to give it a try, Mr. Rogers said. She practiced the way she did everything, with intensity, and competed within a few weeks.

After a particularly good jump in an Army-Navy meet, she threw her arms around Mr. Rogers’ neck. “It was one of those spontaneous moments of joy for both of us,” he said.

Army 2nd Lt Emily Perez
Army 2nd Lt Emily Perez

That was Lieutenant Perez, friends said – bubbly, dedicated, talented, opinionated, confident.
Another West Point classmate, Tanesha Love, who sometimes sought tutoring help from Lieutenant Perez, said, “You could hear her laugh from probably miles away. There was no doubt in your mind who that was as soon as you heard it.”

Lieutenant Perez’s family is establishing a scholarship fund for African-American and Hispanic women who share the soldier’s passion for medical services and sociology.

Services will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at Ebenezer African Methodist Episcopal Church in Fort Washington. Lieutenant Perez will be buried Tuesday at the West Point cemetery in New York.

Survivors include her parents, Daniel and Vicki Perez of Fort Washington; and a brother, Kevyn, of Fayetteville, N.C.

Emily was the first female graduate of West Point to die in the Iraq Wardia, the first West Point graduate of the “Class of 9/11” to die in combat, and the first female African-American officer to die in combat.

Source: The Baltimore Sun

Richard Berrettini

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini


Army Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini

Richard J. Berrettini
Richard J. Berrettini

Died January 11, 2008, Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom

52, of Wilcox, Pa.; assigned to the Pennsylvania Army National Guard Medical Detachment, Erie Clinic, Erie, Pa.; died Jan. 11 in San Antonio of wounds sustained Jan. 2 in Khowst province, Afghanistan when his vehicle encountered an improvised explosive device.


Guardsman dies from injuries sustained in Afghanistan

The Associated Press

HARRISBURG, Pa. — A soldier has died in Texas from combat injuries he suffered in Afghanistan, the Pennsylvania Army National Guard announced Jan. 13.

Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini, 52, from Eldred, McKean County, died Jan. 11, nine days after the attack, which also killed an interpreter and South Carolina National Guard Sgt. Shawn F. Hill, 37, of Wellford, S.C.

Berrettini was scheduled to return home at the end of the month after a year in Afghanistan. A nurse practitioner, he had volunteered to serve in Afghanistan. In civilian life, Berrettini was a Port Allegany High School nurse.

He joined the Pennsylvania National Guard in 1984 and was a former active duty sailor.

“He was a very good man, very professional, somebody, they trusted,” said retired teacher Ron Caskey, a former colleague of Berrettini’s. “He was a confidante.”

Tony Flint, Port Allegany superintendent of schools, said Berrettini had been an elementary school nurse for seven years before becoming a nurse at the high school, where he also worked for seven years.

Berrettini, who died at Brooke Army Medical Center, is survived by his wife, Jane; mother, Doris; brother, Nello; and sons Vincent, 26, and Christopher, 22.

Vincent Berrettini is an Air Force Academy graduate and an Air Force pilot. Christopher Berrettini is a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y.

Source: Military Times


Nurse Killed in Afghanistan Bombing

Pennsylvania school nurse had nearly finished tour of duty.

Author – Jennifer Moser

Army Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini
Army Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini

Lieutenant Colonel Richard J. Berrettini, RN, CRNP, 52, of the Army National Guard, died January 11 of injuries he sustained while serving at Camp Clark in Khowst, Afghanistan. Berrettini, of Eldred, Pennsylvania, was a school nurse in nearby Port Allegany. Injured in a roadside bombing January 2, Berrettini was flown to medical centers in Germany and then Texas, where he died.

“He just had a way about him that would put people at ease,” said Andrew Barrett, ANP-BC, a former coworker at the ED of Bradford Regional Medical Center in Bradford, Pennsylvania. Berrettini had a great sense of humor and great nursing skills, said Brian Benjamin, LPN, also of Bradford Regional. Asked for his favorite memory of Berrettini, Benjamin sighed. “I only have about a million of them,” he said.

Berrettini spent 15 years as a school nurse in elementary and high schools. In Afghanistan, he cared for Camp Clark personnel and for Afghan citizens, especially children. He had nearly completed his one-year tour of duty when he was injured; two others died and one other was injured in the blast. Berrettini is survived by his wife and two grown sons.

Captain David J. McDill, who served with Berrettini at Camp Clark, said, “He hated me saluting him, but I did it because it’s a sign of respect. And he earned mine.

Source: NursingCenter.com