Tony Carrasco

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army CPL. Tony Carrasco Jr.


Army CPL. Tony Carrasco Jr.

Tony Carrasco Jr.
Tony Carrasco Jr.

Died November 4, 2009 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

25, of Berino, N.M.; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 32nd Field Artillery Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan.; died Nov. 4 in Ad Dawr, Iraq, of a gunshot wound sustained when enemy forces attacked his unit.


Teachers say he was a hard-working student

The Associated Press

At Gadsden High School in Anthony, N.M., Tony Carrasco was remembered as a hard worker who didn’t cause problems.

“He was an ag student who was involved in the horticulture program here,” said principal Carey Chambers, who arrived at the school after Carrasco graduated but heard teachers’ memories of him. “By all accounts of everyone we talked to, he was a good kid.”

Army CPL. Tony Carrasco Jr.
Army CPL. Tony Carrasco Jr.

Carrasco, 25, of Berino, N.M., died Nov. 4 in Ad Dawr, Iraq, when he was shot during an attack. He was assigned to Fort Riley, Kan.

His sister, Susana, wrote in an online message board that she remembered her brother’s jokes and all the times he told her to be strong and not take life for granted.

“Those are the things that help me go on. I am very proud of you. You are my HERO!” she wrote.

Carrasco graduated from high school in 2003 and entered the Army in January 2008. A field artillery specialist, he deployed to Iraq earlier this fall.

He is survived by his wife, Johana Lizeth Martinez Gavaldon-Carrasco; stepson, Axel Antonio; stepdaughter, Ilse Iveth; parents, Antonio and Juana Carrasco; and sisters, Rosalia, Susana, and Jessica.


CPL Tony Carrosco Jr. Memorial

Cpl Tony Carrasco Jr., 25, of Berino, N.M.; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 32nd Field Artillery Regiment, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan.; died Nov. 4 in Ad Dawr, Iraq, of a gunshot wound sustained when enemy forces attacked his unit. He was killed in Ad Dawr, Iraq after being hit by sniper fire.

Army Spec. Tony Carrasco Jr., 25, born February 11, 1984 in Las Cruces, NM to Antonio and Juana Carrasco. Tony’s life was cut short while on deployment in Iraq.

Tony Carrasco Jr.
Tony Carrasco Jr.

Tony enlisted with the U.S. Army in January 2008 to serve his country. He was currently stationed in Ft. Riley, KS. Tony was a 2003 graduate of Gadsden High School.

Tony was a caring and loving young man with a heart as big as the world and a big smile to match. He was a loving son, brother, uncle and friend, always with a helping hand.

He was protective of his family and by joining the military he was also protective of his country.

Minhee Kim

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Marine Lance Cpl. Minhee Kim.


Marine Lance Cpl. Minhee Kim

Marine LCpl Minhee Kim
Marine LCpl Minhee Kim

Died November 1, 2006 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

20, of Ann Arbor, Mich.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 24th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division, Marine Forces Reserve, Lansing, Mich.; died Nov. 1 while conducting combat operations in Fallujah, Iraq.


Family, friends mourn A2 soldier slain in Iraq

Minhee Kim, a University of Michigan at Dearborn student, remembered at memorial event

By: Dave Mekelburg
Posted: 11/3/06

Every chair in the Anderson Room of the Michigan Union was filled last night. Those unable to find a seat lined the aisles and gathered at the back.

The sounds of stifled sobbing and crumpling tissues echoed through the room where family and friends had gathered to celebrate the life and mourn the death of Lance Cpl. Minhee Kim.

Kim, 20, died Wednesday in the Anbar province of Iraq. The Marine was a student at the University’s Dearborn campus. He had spent the last 10 years of his life as a resident of Ann Arbor. He had been in Iraq for only a few months.

In a eulogy, his brother, Isaac Kim, spoke about how his brother embraced life and those around him.

Once, when Isaac Kim and his brother were young, Minhee Kim came home with his knee covered in blood. Shocked and worried, his mother asked him what had happened. Kim was completely unfazed by the injury. He calmly told his mother he had hurt it diving for an errant ball in a pickup basketball game.

“He had no fear,” Isaac Kim said as he held back tears.

The speakers at last night’s memorial service painted a portrait of a young man deeply rooted in his faith and his community.

Marine LCpl Minhee Kim
Marine LCpl Minhee Kim

Before leaving for Iraq, Kim had spoken with Pastor Seth Kim of the Harvest Mission Community Church in Ann Arbor about joining the ministry when he returned. When Seth Kim asked Kim why he was joining the Marines, Kim said he wanted to serve his community and the country that had been had so good to him.

When Seth Kim heard those words, “it was a breath of fresh air,” he said.

Another friend told the story of when he and Kim met, playing recreational hockey. As the only Asian Americans on the team, they were drawn to each other. The two forged a friendship. They often stayed up late, jamming on guitars and talking about their faith.

Kim spent his first year of college at Purdue University before transferring to the University’s Dearborn campus last year.

While in Iraq, Kim sent his last e-mail to his friends, family and fellow congregation members exactly a month before he died. Seth Kim read from the e-mail during the service.

The letter said his unit had just arrived at the outskirts of Fallujah. He described the excitement and anxiety of finally seeing battle and wrote about how his faith had been strengthened by the experience.

As the service ended, tears welled in the eyes of nearly everyone in the room. Several people lingered in the room and outside the doors after it was over, hugging, consoling each other and helping to brush aside the tears.

Seth Kim said crying was a necessary part of the process, something that everyone has to go through. But the key, he said, is learning to take joy a the life that had ended so suddenly.

Emily Perez

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army 2nd Lt. Emily J.T. Perez.


Army 2nd Lt. Emily J.T. Perez

Emily J.T. Perez
Emily J.T. Perez

Died September 12, 2006 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

23, of Texas; assigned to 204th Support Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Hood, Texas; died Sept. 12 of injuries sustained when an improvised explosive device detonated near her Humvee during combat operations in Kifl, Iraq.

Source: Military Times


Army officer, 23, leapt high in life cut short by war

By Rona Marech
September 22, 206

Quick and intense. That’s how Emily J.T. Perez performed on the track, one coach said – and the same could be said for the rest of her short life. She was a star student and talented athlete. She was a captain of her high school track team and a leader at her alma mater, the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. She helped start an AIDS ministry at her church.

Army 2nd Lt Emily Perez
2nd Lt. Emily J.T. Perez died Sept. 12 after an improvised explosive detonated near her Humvee.

A 23-year-old soldier from Fort Washington in Prince George’s County, 2nd Lt. Emily J.T. Perez was killed while on duty in Al Kifl, Iraq, on Sept. 12. A Medical Service Corps officer, she died during combat after an improvised explosive device detonated near her Humvee, according to the Department of Defense.

“She was just the kind of kid you want your own children to be like,” said Joe Rogers, the assistant track coach at West Point.

“Emily, as far as I’m concerned, was one of the most brilliant people I ever met. She was the consummate intellectual,” said the Rev. Michael Bell, executive pastor at Peace Baptist Church in Washington. “But she was not the kind of person who was only book-oriented. … She always wanted to help someone, to help the community.”

When she was in high school, Lieutenant Perez was instrumental in starting the HIV/AIDS ministry at her church. She was also an HIV/AIDS educator with the Red Cross.

Her desire to help led to personal sacrifices: Shortly before shipping out to Iraq, Lieutenant Perez flew from Texas to Maryland to be a bone marrow donor to a stranger who was a match, Pastor Bell said.

Lieutenant Perez, who came from a military family, spent much of her youth in Germany. She returned to the United States in 1998 and graduated from Oxon Hill High School in 2001. She excelled at West Point, where she was a medal-winning athlete and a top-ranked cadet, said Jerry Quiller, the head track coach. She also had one of the highest grade-point averages of all the students on the track team, he said.

“You know the old advertisement – ‘Be all you can be,'” Mr. Quiller said. “You probably couldn’t do better than that.”

In her junior year, when the track team was sorely in need of a triple-jump competitor, Emily Perez – who had never attempted the event – volunteered to give it a try, Mr. Rogers said. She practiced the way she did everything, with intensity, and competed within a few weeks.

After a particularly good jump in an Army-Navy meet, she threw her arms around Mr. Rogers’ neck. “It was one of those spontaneous moments of joy for both of us,” he said.

Army 2nd Lt Emily Perez
Army 2nd Lt Emily Perez

That was Lieutenant Perez, friends said – bubbly, dedicated, talented, opinionated, confident.
Another West Point classmate, Tanesha Love, who sometimes sought tutoring help from Lieutenant Perez, said, “You could hear her laugh from probably miles away. There was no doubt in your mind who that was as soon as you heard it.”

Lieutenant Perez’s family is establishing a scholarship fund for African-American and Hispanic women who share the soldier’s passion for medical services and sociology.

Services will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at Ebenezer African Methodist Episcopal Church in Fort Washington. Lieutenant Perez will be buried Tuesday at the West Point cemetery in New York.

Survivors include her parents, Daniel and Vicki Perez of Fort Washington; and a brother, Kevyn, of Fayetteville, N.C.

Emily was the first female graduate of West Point to die in the Iraq Wardia, the first West Point graduate of the “Class of 9/11” to die in combat, and the first female African-American officer to die in combat.

Source: The Baltimore Sun

Richard Berrettini

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini


Army Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini

Richard J. Berrettini
Richard J. Berrettini

Died January 11, 2008, Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom

52, of Wilcox, Pa.; assigned to the Pennsylvania Army National Guard Medical Detachment, Erie Clinic, Erie, Pa.; died Jan. 11 in San Antonio of wounds sustained Jan. 2 in Khowst province, Afghanistan when his vehicle encountered an improvised explosive device.


Guardsman dies from injuries sustained in Afghanistan

The Associated Press

HARRISBURG, Pa. — A soldier has died in Texas from combat injuries he suffered in Afghanistan, the Pennsylvania Army National Guard announced Jan. 13.

Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini, 52, from Eldred, McKean County, died Jan. 11, nine days after the attack, which also killed an interpreter and South Carolina National Guard Sgt. Shawn F. Hill, 37, of Wellford, S.C.

Berrettini was scheduled to return home at the end of the month after a year in Afghanistan. A nurse practitioner, he had volunteered to serve in Afghanistan. In civilian life, Berrettini was a Port Allegany High School nurse.

He joined the Pennsylvania National Guard in 1984 and was a former active duty sailor.

“He was a very good man, very professional, somebody, they trusted,” said retired teacher Ron Caskey, a former colleague of Berrettini’s. “He was a confidante.”

Tony Flint, Port Allegany superintendent of schools, said Berrettini had been an elementary school nurse for seven years before becoming a nurse at the high school, where he also worked for seven years.

Berrettini, who died at Brooke Army Medical Center, is survived by his wife, Jane; mother, Doris; brother, Nello; and sons Vincent, 26, and Christopher, 22.

Vincent Berrettini is an Air Force Academy graduate and an Air Force pilot. Christopher Berrettini is a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y.

Source: Military Times


Nurse Killed in Afghanistan Bombing

Pennsylvania school nurse had nearly finished tour of duty.

Author – Jennifer Moser

Army Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini
Army Lt. Col. Richard J. Berrettini

Lieutenant Colonel Richard J. Berrettini, RN, CRNP, 52, of the Army National Guard, died January 11 of injuries he sustained while serving at Camp Clark in Khowst, Afghanistan. Berrettini, of Eldred, Pennsylvania, was a school nurse in nearby Port Allegany. Injured in a roadside bombing January 2, Berrettini was flown to medical centers in Germany and then Texas, where he died.

“He just had a way about him that would put people at ease,” said Andrew Barrett, ANP-BC, a former coworker at the ED of Bradford Regional Medical Center in Bradford, Pennsylvania. Berrettini had a great sense of humor and great nursing skills, said Brian Benjamin, LPN, also of Bradford Regional. Asked for his favorite memory of Berrettini, Benjamin sighed. “I only have about a million of them,” he said.

Berrettini spent 15 years as a school nurse in elementary and high schools. In Afghanistan, he cared for Camp Clark personnel and for Afghan citizens, especially children. He had nearly completed his one-year tour of duty when he was injured; two others died and one other was injured in the blast. Berrettini is survived by his wife and two grown sons.

Captain David J. McDill, who served with Berrettini at Camp Clark, said, “He hated me saluting him, but I did it because it’s a sign of respect. And he earned mine.

Source: NursingCenter.com