Travis Griffin

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis L. Griffin .


Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis L. Griffin

Died April 3, 2008 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

28, of Dover, Del.; assigned to the 377th Security Forces Squadron, Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M.; died April 3 near Baghdad of wounds sustained when his vehicle encountered an improvised explosive device.


Airman remembered as confident leader

Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis L. Griffin
Staff Sgt. Travis L. Griffin

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis Griffin knew the dangers of serving in Iraq, but the 28-year-old volunteered anyway as part of a yearlong deployment to help train Iraqi police officers. Griffin was on patrol in central Baghdad on Thursday when his vehicle encountered a roadside bomb and he was killed, officials at Kirtland Air Force Base confirmed late Friday. Griffin, who had served in the Air Force for nearly nine years, was a member of the 377th Security Forces Squadron at Kirtland. He had been stationed at the Albuquerque base since July 2004.

Griffin’s mother, Christine Herwick of western Ohio, was at the Clearcreek Christian Assembly in Springboro, Ohio, on Thursday when she learned of her son’s death. Griffin’s picture is on a prayer wall at the church. “He died doing what he loved,” she said. Herwick and Griffin’s stepfather, Donald Herwick III, said he was born in Okinawa, where the Herwicks were both on active duty, and traveled with them from base to base. “We knew there was risk every day,” Donald Herwick said. “He wanted to be there.”

Col. Robert Suminsby, installation commander at Kirtland, said Griffin’s mission in Iraq was much more dangerous than what most airmen are confronted with. “Most deploy for four to six months. He actually volunteered to go on a 365-day tour,” Suminsby said. “He was one of the folks that really stepped up to do not just a very dangerous and demanding mission, but one that was going to last a lot longer.” Griffin, of Dover, Del., had been in Iraq since October and was working with the 732nd Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron. As part of the squadron’s Detachment 3, Griffin and his fellow airmen were focused on helping build Iraq’s police force.

Capt. Kevin Eberhart, operations officer of Kirtland’s security forces, had regular talks with Griffin before he deployed last fall. The two talked about Griffin being safe and taking care of his troops as well as the importance of the mission. “The biggest thing that comes to mind when I think about him is he was definitely the right person if you had to pick one individual from our unit to go over and do this training. He was that one,” Eberhart said.

In a November interview with the American military newspaper Stars and Stripes, Griffin said: “I want to leave knowing that we’ve done something.” Eberhart described Griffin as competent and confident but not arrogant. “He had a capability and a charisma about him,” he said.


Kirtland to rename street for fallen warrior

Kirtland Air Force Base Public Affairs — Kirtland Air Force Base officials will rename a base street April 3 in honor of a fallen warrior.

The ceremony changing the name of M Street to Griffin Avenue in honor of a fallen security forces defender, Staff Sgt. Travis L. Griffin, will be at 10 a.m. at Building 20412, the security forces logistics building. The ceremony’s date commemorates the fourth anniversary of his death, when he was killed in action by a roadside bomb while deployed with the 732nd Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron in Baghdad, Iraq.

Travis L. Griffin
Travis L. Griffin

A former colleague recalled her experience with Griffin. “I was stationed here with Travis when I was on active duty,” said Mirella Bidgood, 377th Security Forces Squadron security specialist. “My husband, at the time, knew him and our kids were the same age, so we hung out together sometimes after work. He was awesome. He was a helper; he would do anything for anybody. He would put people first.” Bidgood said she remembers a time when Griffin helped her while her husband was deployed.  “I was about six or seven months pregnant and had to move on base,” said Bidgood. “So I had a bunch of people trying to help me move. After everyone had left, he stayed and put pictures on the wall, set up my bed and arranged my furniture. I remember him always being upbeat and having a smile on his face.”

Griffin supervised Staff Sgt. Niles Bartram, 377th Weapons Systems Security Squadron, when Bartram arrived at Kirtland AFB as an airman first class. “He was a firm leader who set the standard,” said Bartram. “He was an incredible leader. Anything he had us do, he was willing to do with us. We knew if we ever needed anything we could go to him. He got me well prepared for my job. He was the best NCO in our unit. There is no other person I would rather have been mentored by as a young Airman than Sergeant Griffin.” While stationed here, Griffin was a security forces instructor. His duties included instructing the 550 security forces Airmen on security requirements. He was a key member of the base’s deployment training center, where he instructed more than 300 Airmen in combat operations.

“It was obvious he had a strong personal connection with a number of people in the squadron,” said Chapapas. “Young people came to him for advice, while his peers and colleagues had great confidence in him. A good testament to that when his Humvee was hit, the Army medic who tried to save his life also attended his funeral in Ohio. It was very obvious that he made some of those same connections with the people he deployed with.” “The entire base was soaked in sadness,” said Bartram. “I remember the Freedom Riders lined the entire church. We lined up our whole squadron outside. You could not pack one more person into the church. Everyone was there to honor him.”

Sources:

Christopher Raible

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Marine Lt. Col. Christopher K. Raible.


Marine Lt. Col. Christopher K. Raible

Died September 15, 2012 Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom

40, of North Huntingdon, Pa.; assigned to Marine Attack Squadron 211, Marine Aircraft Group 13, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward); died Sept. 15 at Camp Bastion, Afghanistan, when insurgents breached the base using small-arms and rocket-propelled grenade fire. Also killed was Marine Sgt. Bradley W. Atwell.


Bastion attack kills squadron CO, sergeant

Marine Lt. Col. Christopher K. Raible
Lt. Col. Christopher K. Raible

U.S. forces in Afghanistan were moving forward Monday following a bold attack on Camp Bastion that killed two Marines, including the commanding officer of a Harrier squadron, wounded nine other U.S. personnel and destroyed six Harrier jump jets. Lt. Col. Christopher Raible, 40, and Sgt. Bradley Atwell, 27, were killed after 15 insurgents armed with automatic rifles, rocket-propelled grenades and suicide vests breached the perimeter of Bastion about 10 p.m. Friday. Raible served as the commanding officer of Marine Attack Squadron 211, and Atwell was assigned to Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron 13. Both units are out of Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz.

The attack was launched on a British base that is home to several U.S. Marine aviation units and coalition forces from several other countries. It abuts Camp Leatherneck, the main hub of Marine operations in Afghanistan, forming a sprawling complex connected by bus routes and other services.

Sturdevant, commanding officer of 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing (Forward), told Marine Corps Times that the “more intense fighting was in the first hour or so” after the insurgents breached the wire. However, it took about five hours to ensure that the base was secure. Virtually all of the Marines working on the flight line at the time responded to the attack, as well as personnel with 3rd MAW (Fwd.) living on a nearby portion of Bastion, Sturdevant said.  “Had they not done what they did, it could have been a lot of worse,” Sturdevant said. “Obviously on the wing, we focus on fixing aircraft and flying those aircraft in support of ground forces. But, when forced to, we can quickly transition to offense on the ground, and that’s exactly what happened Friday night.”

U.S. military officials said Saturday that in addition to the two Marines killed, eight service members and one civilian contractor were wounded in the attack. None of their injuries are considered life-threatening, but Sturdevant said two of them have been medically evacuated to the U.S. for additional treatment.


Slain Marine commander’s actions in Afghanistan called heroic

Lt. Col. Christopher K. Raible was heading home to video-chat with his wife after dinner when the first blasts rang out. The pops in the distance on Sept. 14 at Camp Bastion in southern Afghanistan were harbingers of the most audacious Taliban attack on a major NATO base in the decade-long war.

Like most folks in the sprawling remote desert camp, Raible, 40, a Marine fighter pilot, faced two choices: seek cover or run toward the sound of gunfire. “The difference between me and some people is that when they hear gunfire, they run. When I hear gunfire, I run to it,” the squadron commander had often told his Marines, half in jest, recalled Maj. Greer Chambless, who was with Raible on the night of the attack. That evening, Raible did just that. Armed only with a handgun, he embarked on a course that cost him his life and probably averted even more devastating losses, witnesses and comrades said.

At least 15 heavily armed insurgents dressed in U.S. Army uniforms snuck inside the British-run airfield and incinerated six U.S. fighter jets, each worth about $25 million. The attack offered a sobering glimpse of the capabilities of the Taliban in Helmand province, one of the key targets of the American troop surge that ended this past week. It resulted in a staggering loss of military materiel and served as a reminder of the challenges of winding down the war by the end of 2014.

Marine Lt. Col. Christopher K. Raible
Marine Lt. Col. Christopher K. Raible

By daybreak the next morning, as smoke stopped billowing from the airfield and weary commanders gave the all-clear to U.S. Marines and British Special Forces troops who spent the night defending the camp, it wasn’t the threats raised by the infiltration on the minds of many people on the base. Rather, they were primarily struck by the actions of a tough and widely admired commander who returned home in a coffin.

When it became clear Bastion was under attack, Raible threw on body armor and jumped in a vehicle with Chambless. Because his rifle was not nearby, the commander charged into the combat zone armed only with a handgun. The two men exchanged nary a word during the short drive as they scanned the landscape for insurgents. When they got to the flight line, Raible dashed into a maintenance room and began barking out orders to the Marines who would soon push the assailants back.

Backed by a handful of men, he ran toward another building to check whether the troops there were safe. Along the way, Raible and his men were attacked. He and Sgt. Bradley W. Atwell, 27, of Kokomo, Ind., died of wounds from an explosion, said Lt. Col. Stewart Upton, a military spokesman. Chambless was devastated but not particularly surprised. “It was very fitting that he was killed leading his men from the front,” the major said.

The men Raible led out of the maintenance building fought back, pushing one team of five assailants into a remote area of the airfield, where they were killed in an airstrike. A Taliban statement said the intended purpose of the raid was to catch the foreign troops by surprise and attack them in bed. Upton said Raible and his men helped prevent what could have been catastrophic losses. Nine of the remaining assailants were killed in the following hours, and one was wounded. “The feeling is that because of the aggressive counter we were able to contain them,” Upton said.

Sources:

Bruno Solenni

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army Capt. Bruno G. de Solenni.


Army Capt. Bruno G. de Solenni

Died September 20, 2008 Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom

32, of Crescent City, Calif.; assigned to the Joint Forces Headquarters, Element Training Team, Oregon Army National Guard; died Sept. 20 in Kandahar, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle.


Capt. Bruno de Solenni

Bruno Solenni
Capt. Bruno de Solenni

Oregon National Guard Capt. Dominic Oto described Bruno de Solenni as smart, kind and with a steel core that made him the best officer on the team. “He loved the Afghans, and in combat never was there a better operator or leader,” Oto said. “The man was absolutely fearless.”

De Solenni, 32, of Crescent City, Calif., was killed by a roadside bomb Sept. 20 in Kandahar. He was a 1994 high school graduate and was assigned to the Joint Forces Headquarters. 

Before being stationed in Afghanistan for the past nine months, the Oregon National Guardsman had served in Egypt and Iraq, where he had a previous brush with death. “He was on patrol when he had a mortar — it turned out to be a dud — drop right between his legs,” said his father, Mario. “We always thought Bruno was invincible.”

He had labored as a crab fishermen and a logger and was working toward his bachelor’s degree from Southern Oregon University in Ashland. “He was always one to inspire people, no matter where he was, he was able to bring out the good qualities in people,” said his brother, Gino. He also is survived by his mother, Cali Martin.


Army National Guard Capt. Bruno de Solenni, 32, Crescent City; killed by roadside bomb in Afghanistan

As a timber faller, Bruno de Solenni labored through the spring and summer in groves of giant redwood, cedar and fir. As a soldier, he died in Afghanistan, and the tree trunks he sawed and milled became his coffin.

The Army National Guard captain was killed Sept. 20 when a roadside bomb exploded near his vehicle, on which he was a gunner, in Kandahar, Afghanistan, southwest of Kabul.

De Solenni, 32, was assigned to the Joint Forces Headquarters, Element Training Team in Salem, Ore. In Afghanistan, he was helping to train the national army.

Capt. Dominic Oto, who was driving the vehicle when it struck the 500-pound explosive, remembered De Solenni as a natural leader with a generous spirit — “one of the finest battle captains I’ve ever seen.”

Oto met De Solenni in January but said he had heard of him long before. “Everybody always had a Bruno story,” he said. “It was like hanging out with the Fonz. He was the coolest guy you ever met.”

De Solenni’s father, Mario, learned that his son won over Afghan troops when, upon meeting them, he jumped onto a table, raised a fist and yelled, “I am Capt. Bruno! I am here to lead you into battle!”

De Solenni’s mother, California Martin, said, “He was so moved by how terribly the Taliban treated people. He felt a great deal that [the Afghan people] needed someone to help them stand up.”

Bruno Solenni
Bruno de Solenni

A native of Crescent City, Calif., a coastal town of about 7,500 residents just south of the Oregon border, De Solenni had served in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula in 2003 and in Iraq in 2005.

“He started getting deployed a lot when he didn’t have to,” said Todd Nickel, who lowered the casket that he and De Solenni’s family built into the grave they dug at the St. Joseph’s Catholic Church cemetery in Crescent City. “He actually thought they were making a difference.”

Nickel hired De Solenni fresh out of high school at his logging company, Northwest Chopping, but not without hesitation.

“I didn’t think he was really for it,” said Nickel, 47. “It just struck me odd he’d work so hard when he didn’t have to.”

De Solenni persisted and eventually became Nickel’s business partner.

When it wasn’t logging season, the two fished for crab on Nickel’s boat. De Solenni eventually bought his own 36-foot vessel, the Sea Belle.

About twice a year, De Solenni and his identical twin, Ricardo, hunted for deer.

Last November, the brothers and a friend hunted through Colorado, Idaho and Wyoming in what Ricardo de Solenni said “was the best trip I remember” with his brother.

“We were always kind of pranksters, just having a good time,” he said. “Bruno was the guy you wanted to be doing that with. You felt a lot more secure, that he had your back and wouldn’t sell you short.”

“When an Afghan comes up to you thanking you for everything that you have done to help them and for making their [home] a better place now that the Taliban are gone . . . this is probably the biggest reason why I proudly enjoy being over here,” Bruno de Solenni wrote nine days before his death in an e-mail that was later published in his hometown paper, the Daily Triplicate.

De Solenni didn’t join the military in 1996 with the same convictions though. He enlisted the day after Christmas, feeling “like I was going nowhere with my life and needed to take a new direction,” he wrote to a Triplicate reporter. “I was always fascinated with history and the military, and was amazed at some of the hardships my grandfather endured in both WWI and WWII.”

That interest led him to enroll at Southern Oregon University, where in 2004 he earned a bachelor’s degree in history.

While trying to convince Nickel that he was an aspiring lumberjack De Solenni insisted that he had no intention of following in his parents’ footsteps by becoming a lawyer or teacher. In time, his goals changed.

De Solenni filled in as a substitute teacher at his alma mater, Del Norte High School, where his mother teaches Spanish. With his father, a lawyer, he spoke of a future in politics, where he would fight against big government and environmental restrictions on woodlands.

“He took this stuff personally and thought people should do something about it,” Nickel said. “That’s what I admired about him. . . . He believed in what he was doing.” 

In addition to his parents and twin, he is survived by another brother, Gino; and a sister, Pia Conway.

Sources:

Kenneth Cochran

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Marine Lance Cpl. Kenneth E. Cochran.


Marine Lance Cpl. Kenneth E. Cochran

Died January 15, 2012 Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom

20, of Wilder, Idaho; assigned to 9th Engineer Support Battalion, 3rd Marine Logistics Group, III Marine Expeditionary Force, Okinawa, Japan; died Jan. 15 in Helmand province, Afghanistan, while conducting combat operations.


Wilder Marine Kenneth Cochran found joy in helping others

Kenneth Cochran
Marine Lance Cpl. Kenneth E. Cochran

PARMA — Born with his umbilical cord wrapped around his neck, Kenny Cochran spent his first days in a neonatal unit fighting to survive. For the next 20 years, he didn’t take a moment for granted. “Live life every second, because every second counts,” Kenny wrote for an assignment at Parma High School on his life goals. He also wrote that the country he’d most like to visit was Afghanistan. He wanted to be a Marine, and he thought Afghanistan was a place where he could test his body and soul, where he could learn to fight and bring honor to himself and his country.

About 450 people gathered in the Parma High School gymnasium Sunday to remember Kenny. The Marine from Wilder died in Afghanistan Jan. 15 at age 20. In a written statement, Kenny’s mother, Julia, remembered her son as always on the move. As a child, he zoomed around on a red electric Jeep. Later, he graduated to a Model A pickup go-kart his father built, then a motor bike and finally a Camaro. Motoring around, he always shone an ebullient smile, she said.

His uncle, Jim Howell, recalled Kenny as an energetic boy running wild with his brother and sisters. After the others grew tired, Kenny would keep playing, alone. He entertained himself with a game: he would knock on a door then jump out of the doorway and laugh out loud, pretending to surprise himself, Howell remembered.

As he grew, Kenny harnessed his energy. At 13, he decided to become a Marine like his father, George. But he doubted the Marines would take him, so he endeavored to become stronger and smarter. He trained with weights and studied from a book of vocabulary words he kept in his pocket.

Kenny also developed a love for the written word. He had a hard time talking about his beliefs — honor, freedom and responsibility — so he spent endless hours creating stories, poems and essays, expressing himself through writing. “His ideals came from an earlier era of chivalry,” his mother said. “He would have made an exceptional knight during the early Crusades.”

His pastor, Dale Larson, remembered sitting in his pickup truck one day when Kenny approached him and started a conversation. The Parma High graduate seemed so mature and spoke so eloquently about matters of faith that Larson was awestruck. Kenny was concerned about people acting selfishly when there’s so much good work to be done in the world, Larson said. He believed that life is about helping others. “I watched him walk away and thought, there is a good man. He is a good man,” Larson said.

Another time, Kenny visited his uncle’s house, which was under construction. After writing his favorite Bible verse, Psalm 23, on a beam, Kenny climbed up into the unfinished rafters and began walking around. His uncle looked up and expressed concern for his nephew’s safety. “He told me, ‘I’m going to be a Marine. If I fell off, I wouldn’t be a very good Marine.’ I had to let Kenny go. I had to let him be his own person,” Jim Howell said.

Kenneth Cochran
Kenneth E. Cochran

The Cochran family has a legacy of military service. Kenny’s mother, Julia, is an Army captain on active reserve, his father, George, is a retired Marine, and his older sister, Joyce, is an Army specialist. Joyce Cochran was also serving in Afghanistan when Kenny was there. About a week before he died, they spent time together. Kenny showed her around his base and introduced her to his fellow Marines. He was happy to be with his sister and proud to be in Afghanistan following his life’s dreams. “He died wearing his Marine uniform. He was so proud of it. I can be happy knowing he will be in it until the end of time,” Joyce said.


Pendleton, Okinawa Marines die in Afghanistan

Two Marines were killed Sunday in Afghanistan, according to the Defense Department.

Cpl. Jon-Luke Bateman and Lance Cpl. Kenneth E. Cochran died in combat in Helmand province, Pentagon officials said in a news release issued Tuesday. It’s not immediately clear if their deaths are related. Bateman, 22, of Tulsa, Okla., was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, out of Camp Pendleton, Calif. An infantryman, he was on his first combat deployment. Cochran, 20, of Wilder, Idaho, was assigned to 9th Engineer Support Battalion, 3rd Marine Logistics Group, out of Okinawa, Japan. He was a water support technician.

Marines with 2/4 have been operating in the southern part of Musa Qala, according Lt. Col. Bill Vivian, the battalion’s commander, who posted a message Saturday on the unit’s Facebook page. Earlier this month they launched Operation Double Check, aimed at booting Taliban fighters from the area, which he referred to as “contested terrain.” The enemy, he said in his message, “doesn’t want to let it go.”

Vivian said 2/4 is scheduled to be replaced in March by Camp Pendleton’s 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines. Ninth ESB has been in theater only since late-November.

Sources:

Brandon Maggart

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army Sgt. Brandon E. Maggart .


Army Sgt. Brandon E. Maggart

Died August 22, 2010 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

24, of Kirksville, Mo.; assigned to the 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery Regiment, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash; died Aug. 22 at Basrah, Iraq, of wounds sustained when insurgents attacked his unit using indirect fire.


Sergeant survived by wife, son

The Associated Press

Brandon Maggart
Sgt. Brandon Maggart

When it came to sports, Sgt. Brandon Maggart was a fan with his mind made up. He loved the St. Louis Cardinals and University of Missouri teams, and there was no changing that, good season or bad. The military said the 24-year-old from Kirksville, Mo., died Aug. 22 at Basrah, Iraq, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit with indirect fire.

Maggart graduated from Kirksville R-III High School in 2005 and enlisted in June 2006. He was assigned to Joint Base Lewis-McChord and also had served in Iraq from March 2007 until May 2008.

His wife of four years, Teresa, said he was set to visit home on leave in September and had spoken with her through Skype the day before he died.  His family said in his obituary that they’d planned a slew of his favorite activities for him, including golfing, fishing, eating at a steakhouse and going to the ocean and to Seattle Seahawks and Mariners games. They also planned to go to the first soccer game for Maggart’s young son, Blake, whom he’d hoped to teach to hunt and fish.

Maggart’s survivors include his parents, Teddy and Beth Maggart; a brother, Joshua; and a sister, Ashley.


Fallen Soldier honored by unit, friends

By Sgt. Cody Harding, 1st Inf. Div., USD-S PAO September 11, 2010

Sgt. Brandon Maggart was sleeping when the sirens went off August 22. Seconds after the warning, a rocket struck the roof of his housing unit on Basra,. Fellow Soldiers of the 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery Regiment rushed to his side providing medical aid. He was removed from the room and rushed to the troop medical clinic emergency room. Brandon Edward Maggart, 24, a husband and a father from Liberty, Mo., serving his second deployment as an air defense artilleryman with the 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery Regiment, was pronounced dead on arrival. Four days later, a memorial was held for Maggart at the post chapel. Hundreds of people came to say farewell. On the stage, his commander, fellow NCOs, and Soldiers stood side-by-side to talk about Maggart. From Capt. Lloyd Sporluck, commander of Battery A, 5-5 ADA, to Staff Sgt. Simon Cannon, Maggart’s platoon sergeant, the message remained the same: he was a man of character and a person to aspire to be like. “Brandon was a man whose life could be summed up in one word: excellence,” Sporluck said. “In my years of military experience, I’ve never met a man of greater character.” Spc. Kandise Phillips, one of Maggart’s Soldiers, remembered her NCO’s contributions. “As we all know, Sgt. Maggart was a great NCO, leader and friend,” Phillips said. “Spending the last eight months with him, I have learned he was just a kid. He loved to make everyone laugh and was always trying to make the most of every day.”  “Every time I had a question or needed something fixed, Maggart was usually the first person I asked,” said Staff Sgt. Richard Hauser, a platoon sergeant with Battery A. “In addition to being a great Soldier, Brandon was one of the rare people you meet that single-handedly raised the morale of the people around him.” Maggart is survived by his wife, Teresa, and his three year-old son, Blake.

Sources:

Eric Yates

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army 1st Lt. Eric Yates.


Army 1st Lt. Eric Yates

Died September 18, 2010 Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom

26, of Rineyville, Ky.; assigned to 1st Battalion, 502nd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Ky.; died Sept. 18 in Maquan, Zhari district, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device.


ROTC grad dies in Afghanistan

ELIZABETHTOWN, Ky. — A campus memorial service has been scheduled for Sept. 23 at Western Kentucky University for a Rineyville native and graduate of the school’s ROTC program who died in Afghanistan.

1st Lt. Eric D. Yates died Sept. 18 from injuries received when insurgents attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device in the Zhari district in Kandahar province, according to the Army. Yates was assigned to Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 502nd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), at Fort Campbell.

Army 1st Lt Eric Yates
Army 1st Lt Eric Yates

“It’s a sad day here,” Lt. Col. Jason T. Caldwell, head of WKU’s Department of Military Science and Leadership, told The News-Enterprise of Elizabethtown. “It reminds us about what our WKU ROTC graduates can experience when they become officers in the military and defend our country.” Yates graduated from Western Kentucky University in 2008 and was a double major in social studies and history. He received his commission through WKU’s Reserve Officers’ Training Corps program.

“It’s tough to lose a member of the family even if your family is 21,000 students, 2,200 employees and 100,000 alumni,” WKU President Gary Ransdell said, adding Yates was the first ROTC cadet he knew as a student to be killed in action. “We suffered a loss last weekend that brings world events close to home.”

Yates had arrived at Fort Campbell in October 2009, according to the Army. His awards and decorations included the National Defense Service Medal; the Afghanistan Campaign Medal; the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal; the Army Service Ribbon; the Overseas Service Ribbon and the Combat Action Badge.

He is survived by his father, David L. Yates, and mother, Kathy Yates, both of Rineyville.

A 2003 graduate of John Hardin High School in Elizabethtown, Yates is the second graduate of that school to die in Afghanistan in the last two months. Spc. Nathaniel Garvin, a Radcliff native also based at Ford Campbell, died in July in Afghanistan.

Michael Leasor, who graduated with Yates from John Hardin in 2003 and attended elementary school with him in Rineyville, told The News-Enterprise of Elizabethtown that Yates wanted to join the military at a young age. He said he talked with Yates about a month ago, shortly before he deployed. “He was just his usual self,” Leasor said. “He was always kind of quiet … He looked at it as just doing his job.”


Yates wanted to be a teacher

Eric Yates was a quiet soldier who took a no-frills approach to his job and let his work do the talking.

“He looked at it as just doing his job,” said Michael Leasor, who graduated from Kentucky’s John Hardin High School with Yates in 2003.

Former school Principal Brent Holsclaw said Yates didn’t talk much but was a good student who did all that was expected of him.

Eric Yates
Eric Yates

Yates, 26, of Rineyville, Ky., died Sept. 18 in the Zahri district of Kandahar province, Afghanistan. He was assigned to Fort Campbell, Ky. Yates graduated from Western Kentucky University in 2008 with a degree in social studies and history. He was in the school’s ROTC program. Jessica Forrest, a social studies teacher at Hardin High School, said Yates “was a real sensible and likable young man” who couldn’t wait to one day begin a career as a teacher.

Lt. Col. Jason Caldwell, who leads the ROTC program at WKU, said he always heard only good things about Yates.

“He was kind of a quiet, soft-spoken young man, but always got the job done, was always true to his word,” Caldwell said.

Sources:

Kristoffer Domeij

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army Sgt. 1st Class Kristoffer B. Domeij .


Sgt. 1st Class Kristoffer B. Domeij

29, was killed during combat operations in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan when the assault force triggered an improvised explosive device. Domeij was a Ranger Joint Terminal Attack Controller assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Co., 2nd Bn., 75th Ranger Regiment at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. He was on his 14th combat deployment to Afghanistan in support of the War on Terror.


Fort Sill Renames Classroom for Fallen Soldier

Army Sgt. 1st Class Kristoffer B. Domeij
Army Sgt. 1st Class Kristoffer B. Domeij

LAWTON, Okla. — A classroom facility at Fort Sill has been named in honor of a soldier killed in Afghanistan on his 14th deployment. Friends and family of Sgt. 1st Class Kristoffer B. Domeij gathered Monday in Lawton for a ceremony. Officials said the classroom used for Fort Sill’s Joint Fires Observer course is now known as Domeij Hall.

Domeij, a native of Santa Ana, Calif., was killed in October 2011 with two other soldiers in Kandahar province. The commander of Domeij’s unit, Lt. Col. Greg Anderson, said Domeij was stationed at Fort Sill early in his career and returned to learn joint fires.

The facility trains soldiers on the ground to communicate and give directions to soldiers in the air. Officials say Domeij graduated from Fort Sill’s JFO course in 2005.


Sgt. 1st Class Kristoffer B. Domeij, 2nd Bn., 75th Ranger Regiment, Killed In Action

  • Sergeant Kristoffer B. Domeij was a 10-year veteran and is set to receive posthumous Purple Heart
  • He is now the Elite Ranger with most deployments to be killed in action – the previous record was 12
  • One of the team that rescued Jessica Lynch from captors in Iraq in 2003
Army Sgt. 1st Class Kristoffer B. Domeij
Sgt. 1st Class Domeij

Sgt. 1st Class Kristoffer B. Domeij, 29, was killed during combat operations in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan when the assault force triggered an improvised explosive device. Domeij was a Ranger Joint Terminal Attack Controller assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Co., 2nd Bn., 75th Ranger Regiment at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. He was on his 14th combat deployment to Afghanistan in support of the War on Terror.

“Sgt. 1st Class Domeij was the prototypical special operations NCO – technically and tactically competent Joint Terminal Attack Controller and veteran of a decade of deployments to both Iraq and Afghanistan and hundreds of combat missions. His ability to employ fire support platforms made him a game changer on the battlefield – an operator who in real terms had the value of an entire strike force on the battlefield,” said Col. Mark W. Odom, commander of the 75th Ranger Regiment.

“Sgt. 1st Class Kris Domeij will be dearly missed by the men of 2nd Ranger Bn. He was one of those men who was known by all as much for his humor, enthusiasm, and loyal friendship, as he was for his unparalleled skill and bravery under fire,” said Lt. Col. David Hodne, commander of 2nd Bn., 75th Ranger Regiment. “This was a Ranger you wanted at your side when the chips were down. He and his family are very much part of the fabric that defines 2nd Ranger Bn. He is irreplaceable…in our formation…and in our hearts.”

Domeij was born October 5, 1982 in San Diego, Calif. After graduating from Rancho Bernardo High School in 2000, he enlisted in the U.S. Army in July, 2001 from San Diego, Calif. Domeij completed Basic Combat Training and Fire Support Advanced Individual Training at Fort Sill, Okla. After graduating from the Basic Airborne Course, he was assigned to the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program at Fort Benning. Following graduation from the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program, Domeij was assigned to Co. C, 2nd Bn., 75th Ranger Regiment in 2002 where he served as a Forward Observer. He also served in Headquarters and Headquarters Co. (HHC), as a Reconnaissance Joint Terminal Attack Controller, Co., B as the Fire Support Noncommissioned Officer, and again in HHC as the Battalion Fires Support Noncommissioned Officer.

Domeij was also a Joint Terminal Attack Controller – Evaluator and was one of the first Army qualified JTAC’s, training which is usually reserved for members of the Air Force. Domeij’s military education includes the Basic Airborne Course, the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program, the Warrior Leader’s Course, the Advanced Leader’s Course, the Senior Leader’s Course, U.S. Army Ranger School, Jumpmaster School, Pathfinder School, Joint Firepower Control Course, and Joint Fires Observer Course. His awards and decorations include the Ranger Tab, Combat Action Badge, Expert Infantry Badge, Senior Parachutist Badge, the Pathfinder Badge and the U.S. Army Expert Rifle Marksmanship Qualification Badge.

He is survived by his wife, Sarah and daughters Mikajsa and Aaliyah of Lacey, Wash.; his mother Scoti Domeij of Colorado Springs, Colo., and his brother Kyle Domeij of San Diego, Calif.

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Errol Milliard

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army Pfc. Errol D.A. Milliard.


Errol D. A. “Elijah” Milliard, PFC

Errol D. A. Milliard
Army Private. Errol D.A. Milliard

Pfc. Errol D. A. Milliard, 18, of Birmingham, Ala., died July 4 in Farah province, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained when enemy forces attached his unit with a rocket propelled grenade while on dismounted patrol. He was assigned to the 2nd Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade, White Sands Missile Range, N.M. Known by most as Elijah, he is a graduate of George Washington Carver High School, Birmingham, Ala., class of 2012. Milliard was a combat engineer and arrived on active duty with the Army in 2012. Before coming to White Sands, he was stationed at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., graduating with 18 of his peers who arrived at WSMR with him. He deployed to Afghanistan in February 2013. This was his first deployment. His awards and decorations include Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Ribbon, and Global War on Terrorism Service, NATO Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal and the National Defense Service Medal. He was the posthumous recipient of the Bronze Star, Purple Heart and Good Conduct Medal. He was promoted posthumously from PV2 to Private First Class.


Sad Goodbye To Caribbean-American War Hero

He died on America’s birthday and 18-year-old Army Private. Errol D.A. Milliard is being mourned by relatives and friends in Brooklyn and Birmingham, Alabama.

Guyana-born Milliard, 18, of Birmingham, Ala., died July 4 in Farah province, Afghanistan, after his unit enemy forces attacked his patrol with a rocket propelled grenade, reported the U.S. Department of Defense. Assigned to the 2nd Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade, White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, Millard, who was also by known the nickname as  “Elijah,: was on his first tour in Afghanistan.

Millard, was posthumously promoted him to private first class and awarded the Bronze Star, Purple Heart and a Good Conduct Medal.

He lived in Alabama, but he grew up in Brooklyn and moved to Birmingham to finish high school, said a spokesman  for City Council Member Jumaane Williams (D-Brooklyn), who released a statement about the private’s recent burial at Calverton National Cemetery on Long Island on July 15. The funeral was held at Clarendon Road Church.

“My prayers for peace and comfort go to the family and friends of PFC Errol (Elijah) Milliard, as well as to his fellow soldiers that are surviving him” read Willliams’ statement. “While the pain of burying a child is one no parent should ever bear, I hope that Zuwena and Evan have pride in how Elijah chose to pursue service of the highest level, and that his community will never forget this young man who gave his life for our country with honor and distinction.

“Elijah, as he was called by those close to him, was an outstanding young man who displayed diligence, perseverance and charisma in the classroom and on the battlefield. Like many men and women before him, he saw the military as an opportunity to develop as a leader, with the ultimate goal of enrolling in college.”

“As a child of Grenadian parentage, I am keenly aware of the proud history of service and sacrifice by Caribbean-Americans in our nation, a history to which Elijah belongs. Every day, young immigrants are volunteering to serve in our nation’s military and putting their lives on the line. We must do all we can to support them and their families, especially in their hour of need,” said Williams, who noted Millard’s parents are from Guyana and Jamaica.

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Jose Rosado

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army Staff Sgt. Jose Cintron Rosado.


Guardsman Was Hero To Family

Army Staff Sgt. Jose Cintron Rosado
SSgt. Jose M. Cintron Rosado

Jose Cintron Rosado loved the military and was a hero to his family, his wife said.

He was such a hero that his son Carlos, 14, insisted that he have a chance to stand guard over his father’s coffin for a shift. The teen is a member of the Junior ROTC in Puerto Rico.

“This is the greatest thing for him,” Maria Robles Cintron said. “He always said, ‘Mommy, I want to be there beside him to see how proud I am.’

Cintron Rosado, 38, of Vega Alta, Puerto Rico, was killed by a roadside bomb Jan. 2 in Taji, Iraq. He was a member of the Puerto Rico Army National Guard based in Aguadilla. Another soldier, Jose A. Delgado Arroyo, also was killed in the bombing.

Robles Cintron said her husband loved being in the military. “He died a hero. For me and my children,” she said. He leaves behind another son, Kevin.

Maj. Paul Dahlen of the Puerto Rico National Guard said the two men were tasked with clearing bombs from roadways. They had deployed to Iraq together in April. He said their deaths had been especially tough on their comrades.

“We’re a pretty close group,” Dahlen said. “We consider ourselves a family.”


Best Friends SSgt. Jose M. Cintron Rosado and Sgt. Jose A. Delgado Arroyo Die Together In Iraqi Insurgent Ambush

Two members of the PRNG completed their mission on January 2, 2011 in Taji, Iraq, after succumbing to wounds suffered when insurgents attacked their unit with an improvised explosive device.  They were assigned to the 1013th Engineer (Sapper) Company of the Puerto Rico Army National Guard, Aguadilla, Puerto Rico.

Best friends SSgt. Jose M. Cintron Rosado and Sgt. Jose A. Delgado Arroyo were the first US Soldiers to make the ultimate sacrifice in Iraq this year.  They will be remembered, appreciated, and saluted for years to come.  “We are united in pain and suffering with the families of these heroes who lived and embodied the highest values of our institution. The memory of their lives and actions will remain with us always,” PRNG Adjutant Gen. Antonio Vicéns said.

Members of the PRNG’s 1013 Engineering Company, both citizen soldiers were in the lead vehicle in a convoy when a roadside bomb was detonated near the city of Taji. Cintrón and Delgado were on a mission to find the very type of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) that claimed their lives. They were the only people killed in the blast. “That is the toughest mission in Iraq. Going out to find bombs on main roadways is heavy,” Vicéns said. Best friends, the soldiers were deployed together in April. The soldiers were posthumously promoted: Cintrón Rosado to staff sergeant, Delgado Arroyo to sergeant. “It’s a tough job, a dangerous job,” said Major Paul Dahlen, a PRNG spokesman Dahlen. “They’re the ones looking to…ensure roadways, so that everyone can continue their jobs and peace in the area.”

Cintrón Rosado, 38, of Vega Alta, is survived by his wife María Robles and two sons Kevin, 12, and Carlos, 14. “My husband adored the military,” Robles said during a press conference this week. “It was his life, his passion. He was committed to do it for his country.”

Delgado Arroyo, 41, of Río Grande, was a municipal police officer on leave from his job after being called to active duty in Iraq. He leaves behind a wife, Zugeily Colón del Valle, a son and a daughter. “Any loss is tragic and tough,” said Dahlen. “We’re a pretty close group. We consider ourselves a family.”

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Jaime Campbell

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is 1st Lt. Jaime L. Campbell.


Jaime L. Campbell
Jaime L. Campbell

A former Washington state rodeo queen and three Anchorage-area men were the four Alaska Army National Guard crew members who died in a weekend helicopter crash in northern Iraq, relatives and friends say. Family, friends and officials identified the victims as 1st Lt. Jaime Campbell of Fort Wainwright, Chief Warrant Officer Chester Troxel of Anchorage, and Specialists Michael Ignatius Edwards of Anchorage and Jacob Eugene Melson of Wasilla.

All four were members of the Guard’s 1st Battalion, 207th Aviation Regiment. Four civilians and four other military personnel also were killed in the crash Saturday. Campbell, 25, and Troxel, 44, were piloting the UH-60L Black Hawk when the aircraft went down, Brig. Gen. Craig Christensen, the state guard’s commander, said Tuesday.

Campbell had been living at the Fairbanks post with her husband. Army Capt. Sam Campbell also is in Iraq and will fly back with his wife’s body, said her mother, Miki Krausse of Ephrata, Wash. Between sobs during a phone interview, Krausse described Jaime Campbell as selfless and talented, an artist and expert horsewoman, the eldest of three daughters.

While still in high school in Ephrata, she mastered her horse-handling skills so well she represented the state as rodeo queen. She enlisted in the Washington Army National Guard in 1999, joining the Alaska counterpart in March 2003. “When she decided to do something, it had to be her best,” Krausse said. “She was as beautiful inside as she was outside.” Campbell was the state rodeo queen in 1998, the same year she graduated from Ephrata High School as student body president.

She joined the Washington Army National Guard midway through her studies at Washington State University to help pay for school, and graduated with a degree in interior design in 2003, Campbell’s father, Jeff Krausse, told The Wenatchee World. She chose to stay with the National Guard to pursue an aviation career, he said.

Jaime and her mother e-mailed each other every day. She also was close with her father, an Army command sergeant major who just returned from his own tour in Iraq. Jeff Krausse said he spent five days with his daughter two months ago during a short break. His last image is of her in the pilot’s seat when she flew him back to his post. “I never got to give her a hug goodbye,” he said, his voice breaking. The last time Miki Krausse heard Jaime’s voice was when she called to wish everyone a happy New Year. “She said she loved us and missed us and couldn’t wait to come home,” she said. “She always told us she was safe, that she could take care of herself. She said not to worry about her.”


Birth: Jun. 14, 1980, Olympia, Thurston County, Washington, USA
Death: Jan. 7, 2006, Iraq

Jaime L. Campbell
1st Lt. Jaime L. Campbell

1st Lt. Jaime L. Campbell of Ephrata, Washington is the daughter of Miki and Jeff Krausse. Born into a tradition of military service, her father, a Command Sergeant Major and her grandfather also served in the United States Army during World War II.

Jaime grew up in Washington State in East County and moved to Ephrata during junior high before graduating from Ephrata High School where she was student-body president. She also graduated from Washington State University in 2002 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in apparel, design and merchandising.

The eldest of three daughters, she was selfless and talented, an artist and an expert horsewoman. While still in high school, she mastered her horse-handling skills so well that she was selected the state’s rodeo queen in 1998.

When Jaime decided to do something, it had to be her best. She was as beautiful inside as she was outside. She lived in Alaska for the last two years with her husband, Capt. Samuel Campbell, who had been stationed at Fort Wainwright with the Army.

Jaime originally joined the Army as an enlisted soldier, but joined the National Guard in April 1999 to help pay for college. She liked the idea of flying so much she made aviation her career. She was proud to serve her country but nervous about her tour of duty. And she took comfort knowing that both her husband, Sam, and her father also were stationed in Iraq.

Her father, a career military man, spent a year in Iraq before returning on Thanksgiving, just a week after last seeing his daughter. Meanwhile, Sam and Jaime were stationed just 150 miles apart in Iraq, and made daily phone calls when possible. They last saw each other the week before.

Both Samuel and Jaime deployed to Iraq in September 2005. The pair had been married a little more than three years. They first met at the National Rodeo High School Finals in Pueblo, Colorado. Their paths crossed again at a Reserve Officer Training Corps camp at Fort Lewis, Washington. Jaime was a pilot on the UH-60L Blackhawk that went down in bad weather near the town of Tal-Afar. All four National Guard crew members and eight passengers aboard were killed. Her husband, Sam was also in Iraq when she died and he escorted her remains home from Iraq.

Jaime is survived by her husband, Capt. Sam Campbell; father and mother, Jeff and Miki Krausse; and her sisters, Jenny Powers and Jessica Krausse.

Sources: 

  • mil.wa.gov
  • findagrave.com
  • Military Times – HONOR THE FALLEN

Robert Love Jr

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Army Staff Sgt. Robert L. Love Jr.


Birth: Sep. 1, 1978
Livingston
Madison County
Mississippi, USA
Death: Dec. 1, 2006, Iraq

Robert L. Love Jr.
Army Staff Sgt. Robert L. Love Jr.

Army Staff Sgt. Love was assigned to the 16th Engineer Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, Giessen, Germany. Love died of injuries sustained when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle during combat operations in Ramadi. Robert was a 1996 graduate of Livingston High School in west Alabama where he was the section leader of the trombone section in the marching band. He never talked about what he wanted to do after graduation but he started selling vacuum cleaners right out of high school. He liked to work; he always had to have something to do but he wanted to do more with his life and joined the Army. James and his wife, Staff Sgt. Brianna Love, were sent to Germany at the same time. They have a 3-year-old daughter and Robert has an 11-year-old daughter from a previous relationship. His family remembers him as a quiet child who stayed close to his mother’s side. When his siblings were outside, he would stay in the house around his mom and he didn’t talk much. As he grew older, that character stayed with him – he was kind of quiet and stayed to himself. Robert was a very sweet person who got along with everyone – everyone loved him and he loved everyone.


Robert L. Love Jr.
The Love Family

LIVINGSTON, Ala. — An Army sergeant from Livingston was killed last week by a roadside bomb — the third Iraq casualty from Alabama in one week.

Staff Sgt. Robert L. Love Jr. died Dec. 1 in Ramadi when an improvised explosive device, or IED, blew up near his vehicle during combat. Two other Alabama soldiers, Spc. Christopher Mason, 32, of Mobile, and Spc. Jon-Erik Loney, 21, of Hartselle, died Nov. 28 in separate bombings in Iraq.

Love, 28, a 1996 graduate of Livingston High School in west Alabama, was assigned to the 16th Engineer Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, Giessen, Germany.

The Defense Department initially announced Thursday that Love was from Meridian, Miss., but Love was born across the line in nearby Livingston, according to school officials.

His mother, Mary Love, contacted Friday in Livingston, said her son and his wife, Staff Sgt. Brianna K. Love, were sent to Germany at the same time. He said the couple had a 3-year-old daughter and Robert Love has an 11-year-old daughter.

“My daughter-in-law called me yesterday,” she said. “He was supposed to come home in January.”

Mary Love said her son, one of five children, had played in the band at Livingston High. She said he had immediately enlisted in the Army after graduation and had served eight years. She said she did not know why the Department of Defense listed her son’s hometown as Meridian, Miss., which is nearby.

“Brianna said they have his body in Delaware,” she said. “They’re supposed to be doing a service for him Dec. 16 in Germany. The body should be here on the 17th and she wanted to have the funeral on the 20th.”

The soldier’s father, Robert Love Sr., said his son’s loss “has been hard but we’re holding up. You know, he was supposed to come home soon.”

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