Travis Griffin

by Wayne Thume on December 1, 2016

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis L. Griffin .


Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis L. Griffin

Died April 3, 2008 Serving During Operation Iraqi Freedom

28, of Dover, Del.; assigned to the 377th Security Forces Squadron, Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M.; died April 3 near Baghdad of wounds sustained when his vehicle encountered an improvised explosive device.

Travis Griffin

Airman remembered as confident leader

The Associated Press

 

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis Griffin knew the dangers of serving in Iraq, but the 28-year-old volunteered anyway as part of a yearlong deployment to help train Iraqi police officers. Griffin was on patrol in central Baghdad on Thursday when his vehicle encountered a roadside bomb and he was killed, officials at Kirtland Air Force Base confirmed late Friday. Griffin, who had served in the Air Force for nearly nine years, was a member of the 377th Security Forces Squadron at Kirtland. He had been stationed at the Albuquerque base since July 2004.

Griffin’s mother, Christine Herwick of western Ohio, was at the Clearcreek Christian Assembly in Springboro, Ohio, on Thursday when she learned of her son’s death. Griffin’s picture is on a prayer wall at the church. “He died doing what he loved,” she said. Herwick and Griffin’s stepfather, Donald Herwick III, said he was born in Okinawa, where the Herwicks were both on active duty, and traveled with them from base to base. “We knew there was risk every day,” Donald Herwick said. “He wanted to be there.”

Col. Robert Suminsby, installation commander at Kirtland, said Griffin’s mission in Iraq was much more dangerous than what most airmen are confronted with. “Most deploy for four to six months. He actually volunteered to go on a 365-day tour,” Suminsby said. “He was one of the folks that really stepped up to do not just a very dangerous and demanding mission, but one that was going to last a lot longer.” Griffin, of Dover, Del., had been in Iraq since October and was working with the 732nd Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron. As part of the squadron’s Detachment 3, Griffin and his fellow airmen were focused on helping build Iraq’s police force.

Capt. Kevin Eberhart, operations officer of Kirtland’s security forces, had regular talks with Griffin before he deployed last fall. The two talked about Griffin being safe and taking care of his troops as well as the importance of the mission. “The biggest thing that comes to mind when I think about him is he was definitely the right person if you had to pick one individual from our unit to go over and do this training. He was that one,” Eberhart said.

In a November interview with the American military newspaper Stars and Stripes, Griffin said: “I want to leave knowing that we’ve done something.” Eberhart described Griffin as competent and confident but not arrogant. “He had a capability and a charisma about him,” he said.

http://thefallen.militarytimes.com/air-force-staff-sgt-travis-l-griffin/3466852

Travis Griffin

Kirtland to rename street for fallen warrior

By Stefan Bocchino, 377th Air Base Wing Public Affairs / Published March 22, 2012

 

Kirtland Air Force Base Public Affairs — Kirtland Air Force Base officials will rename a base street April 3 in honor of a fallen warrior.

The ceremony changing the name of M Street to Griffin Avenue in honor of a fallen security forces defender, Staff Sgt. Travis L. Griffin, will be at 10 a.m. at Building 20412, the security forces logistics building. The ceremony’s date commemorates the fourth anniversary of his death, when he was killed in action by a roadside bomb while deployed with the 732nd Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron in Baghdad, Iraq.

A former colleague recalled her experience with Griffin. “I was stationed here with Travis when I was on active duty,” said Mirella Bidgood, 377th Security Forces Squadron security specialist. “My husband, at the time, knew him and our kids were the same age, so we hung out together sometimes after work. He was awesome. He was a helper; he would do anything for anybody. He would put people first.” Bidgood said she remembers a time when Griffin helped her while her husband was deployed.  “I was about six or seven months pregnant and had to move on base,” said Bidgood. “So I had a bunch of people trying to help me move. After everyone had left, he stayed and put pictures on the wall, set up my bed and arranged my furniture. I remember him always being upbeat and having a smile on his face.”

Griffin supervised Staff Sgt. Niles Bartram, 377th Weapons Systems Security Squadron, when Bartram arrived at Kirtland AFB as an airman first class. “He was a firm leader who set the standard,” said Bartram. “He was an incredible leader. Anything he had us do, he was willing to do with us. We knew if we ever needed anything we could go to him. He got me well prepared for my job. He was the best NCO in our unit. There is no other person I would rather have been mentored by as a young Airman than Sergeant Griffin.” While stationed here, Griffin was a security forces instructor. His duties included instructing the 550 security forces Airmen on security requirements. He was a key member of the base’s deployment training center, where he instructed more than 300 Airmen in combat operations.

“It was obvious he had a strong personal connection with a number of people in the squadron,” said Chapapas. “Young people came to him for advice, while his peers and colleagues had great confidence in him. A good testament to that when his Humvee was hit, the Army medic who tried to save his life also attended his funeral in Ohio. It was very obvious that he made some of those same connections with the people he deployed with.” “The entire base was soaked in sadness,” said Bartram. “I remember the Freedom Riders lined the entire church. We lined up our whole squadron outside. You could not pack one more person into the church. Everyone was there to honor him.”

http://www.kirtland.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/389495/kirtland-to-rename-street-for-fallen-warrior

 

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Christopher Raible

by Wayne Thume on November 6, 2016

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom. This month’s Honoree is Marine Lt. Col. Christopher K. Raible.


Marine Lt. Col. Christopher K. Raible

Died September 15, 2012 Serving During Operation Enduring Freedom

40, of North Huntingdon, Pa.; assigned to Marine Attack Squadron 211, Marine Aircraft Group 13, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward); died Sept. 15 at Camp Bastion, Afghanistan, when insurgents breached the base using small-arms and rocket-propelled grenade fire. Also killed was Marine Sgt. Bradley W. Atwell.

Bastion attack kills squadron CO, sergeant

By Dan Lamothe

Marine Lt. Col. Christopher K. Raible

Lt. Col. Christopher K. Raible

U.S. forces in Afghanistan were moving forward Monday following a bold attack on Camp Bastion that killed two Marines, including the commanding officer of a Harrier squadron, wounded nine other U.S. personnel and destroyed six Harrier jump jets. Lt. Col. Christopher Raible, 40, and Sgt. Bradley Atwell, 27, were killed after 15 insurgents armed with automatic rifles, rocket-propelled grenades and suicide vests breached the perimeter of Bastion about 10 p.m. Friday. Raible served as the commanding officer of Marine Attack Squadron 211, and Atwell was assigned to Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron 13. Both units are out of Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz.

The attack was launched on a British base that is home to several U.S. Marine aviation units and coalition forces from several other countries. It abuts Camp Leatherneck, the main hub of Marine operations in Afghanistan, forming a sprawling complex connected by bus routes and other services.

Sturdevant, commanding officer of 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing (Forward), told Marine Corps Times that the “more intense fighting was in the first hour or so” after the insurgents breached the wire. However, it took about five hours to ensure that the base was secure. Virtually all of the Marines working on the flight line at the time responded to the attack, as well as personnel with 3rd MAW (Fwd.) living on a nearby portion of Bastion, Sturdevant said.  “Had they not done what they did, it could have been a lot of worse,” Sturdevant said. “Obviously on the wing, we focus on fixing aircraft and flying those aircraft in support of ground forces. But, when forced to, we can quickly transition to offense on the ground, and that’s exactly what happened Friday night.”

U.S. military officials said Saturday that in addition to the two Marines killed, eight service members and one civilian contractor were wounded in the attack. None of their injuries are considered life-threatening, but Sturdevant said two of them have been medically evacuated to the U.S. for additional treatment.

Military Times


 

Slain Marine commander’s actions in Afghanistan called heroic

By Ernesto Londoño

Lt. Col. Christopher K. Raible was heading home to video-chat with his wife after dinner when the first blasts rang out. The pops in the distance on Sept. 14 at Camp Bastion in southern Afghanistan were harbingers of the most audacious Taliban attack on a major NATO base in the decade-long war.

Like most folks in the sprawling remote desert camp, Raible, 40, a Marine fighter pilot, faced two choices: seek cover or run toward the sound of gunfire. “The difference between me and some people is that when they hear gunfire, they run. When I hear gunfire, I run to it,” the squadron commander had often told his Marines, half in jest, recalled Maj. Greer Chambless, who was with Raible on the night of the attack. That evening, Raible did just that. Armed only with a handgun, he embarked on a course that cost him his life and probably averted even more devastating losses, witnesses and comrades said.

At least 15 heavily armed insurgents dressed in U.S. Army uniforms snuck inside the British-run airfield and incinerated six U.S. fighter jets, each worth about $25 million. The attack offered a sobering glimpse of the capabilities of the Taliban in Helmand province, one of the key targets of the American troop surge that ended this past week. It resulted in a staggering loss of military materiel and served as a reminder of the challenges of winding down the war by the end of 2014.

Marine Lt. Col. Christopher K. Raible

Marine Lt. Col. Christopher K. Raible

By daybreak the next morning, as smoke stopped billowing from the airfield and weary commanders gave the all-clear to U.S. Marines and British Special Forces troops who spent the night defending the camp, it wasn’t the threats raised by the infiltration on the minds of many people on the base. Rather, they were primarily struck by the actions of a tough and widely admired commander who returned home in a coffin.

When it became clear Bastion was under attack, Raible threw on body armor and jumped in a vehicle with Chambless. Because his rifle was not nearby, the commander charged into the combat zone armed only with a handgun. The two men exchanged nary a word during the short drive as they scanned the landscape for insurgents. When they got to the flight line, Raible dashed into a maintenance room and began barking out orders to the Marines who would soon push the assailants back.

Backed by a handful of men, he ran toward another building to check whether the troops there were safe. Along the way, Raible and his men were attacked. He and Sgt. Bradley W. Atwell, 27, of Kokomo, Ind., died of wounds from an explosion, said Lt. Col. Stewart Upton, a military spokesman. Chambless was devastated but not particularly surprised. “It was very fitting that he was killed leading his men from the front,” the major said.

The men Raible led out of the maintenance building fought back, pushing one team of five assailants into a remote area of the airfield, where they were killed in an airstrike. A Taliban statement said the intended purpose of the raid was to catch the foreign troops by surprise and attack them in bed. Upton said Raible and his men helped prevent what could have been catastrophic losses. Nine of the remaining assailants were killed in the following hours, and one was wounded. “The feeling is that because of the aggressive counter we were able to contain them,” Upton said.

Washington Post

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Bruno Solenni

October 3, 2016

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for […]

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Kenneth Cochran

September 6, 2016

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for […]

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Brandon Maggart

August 1, 2016

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for […]

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1st Quarter 2016 Newsletter

July 6, 2016
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4th Quarter 2015 Newsletter

July 6, 2016
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Jaysine Petree

July 5, 2016

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for […]

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Eric Yates

June 1, 2016

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for […]

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Kristoffer Domeij

May 3, 2016

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for […]

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Errol Milliard

April 1, 2016
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Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for […]

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Jose Rosado

March 10, 2016
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Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for […]

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Jaime Campbell

February 2, 2016
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Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for […]

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11th Annual Benefit Poker Run

February 1, 2016
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The American Legion Riders from the LT Warren Eaton Post 189,  Norwich New York are having their 11th Annual Benefit Poker Run to support the LHCP this May 21, 2016.

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3rd Quarter 2015 Newsletter

January 19, 2016
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Our 3rd Quarter 2015 Newsletter is out. Please download a copy for yourself, family, friends, and community. In this issue we have the following: SGT Harris Memorial Ride Upcoming Events Troop Thanks LHCP Sponsors 3rd Quarter Honorees 2015 3rd Quarter Shipments Unit Needs 3rd Quarter 2015 Newsletter

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Pocatello Veterans Home

January 19, 2016
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The 56 men and women who are residents of the Pocatello Veterans Home in Pocatello, Idaho each received an overflowing handmade Christmas stocking this year. The stockings were donated by the LHCP Stitches of Love group and the stocking stuffers were donated by an Idaho business. James Spliedt, the LHCP Secretary, and his family volunteered […]

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Salt Lake City VA Medical Center

January 18, 2016
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On December 15, 2015 the LHCP Secretary, James Spliedt, delivered 211 handmade Christmas stockings to Salt Lake City VA medical center. All of these handmade stockings were donated by the LHCP Stitches of Love group. Belinad Karabalsos for the Voluntary Services Office was delighted to receive these marvelous stockings, and was looking forward to presenting […]

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Robert Love Jr

January 3, 2016
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Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for […]

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Rachel Bosveld

December 1, 2015
Rachel Bosveld

Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for […]

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Michael Weidemann

November 1, 2015
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Since its inception, each month LHCP has honored a military service member who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Every box which is shipped from LHCP is labeled with information about the Honoree. The monthly Honoree’s story is attached to the box so others can read about those who have sacrificed their lives for […]

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